Full TGIF Record # 110196
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Web URL(s):http://usgatero.msu.edu/v05/n07.pdf
    Last checked: 10/24/2016
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https://web.archive.org/web/20080723091115/http://agcsa.com.au/static/atm_articles/html/9_3_3b.html
    Last checked: 10/24/2016
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Notes: Australian Turfgrass Management reprint
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Harman, G. E.; Nelson, E. B.; Ondik, K. L.
Author Affiliation:Harman and Ondik: Departments of Horticultural Sciences and Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Geneva, New York; Nelson: Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York;
Title:Fungicide application effects on non-target microbial populations of putting greens
Source:USGA Turfgrass and Environmental Research Online. Vol. 5, No. 7, April 1 2006, p. [1-6].
# of Pages:8
Publishing Information:Far Hills, NJ: United States Golf Association, Green Section
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Golf greens; Non-target effects; Fungicides; Maintenance intensity; Soil microorganisms; Fungi; Fungicide evaluation; Fungicide application; Fungus infection; Bacterium infection
Abstract/Contents:"Reseachers at Cornell University tested the hypothesis that repeated applications of fungicides to putting greens would have major impacts on microbial populations of both foliar and soil-borne microbes. [Surprisingly], this was not the case. Their results include: The total number of fungal propagules detected was greater in soil at the start of the season than later, but there were no significant effects even after the season-long application of fungicides, regardless of the fungicide applied. On leaves, there were no significant effects of fungicide applications on total numbers of fungi, regardless of time or fungicide application. Most of the fungi detected were in the genus Trichoderma. The relative numbers of filamentous fungi versus yeasts changed substantially on turf leaves as evidenced by both the numbers and plate appearances. However, there was no significant difference in total microbial metabolic activity among fungicide treatments. It does not appear that repeated applications of fungicides have major impacts on soil microbial communities."
Language:English
References:5
See Also:Other Reports from this USGA research project: 1996-10-097
Note:Partial reprint appears in Chips & Putts, 12(2) April 2006, p. 4
Partial reprint appears in Sea to Sand, 1(5) May 2006, p. 18
Partial reprint appears in Inforemer, 15(1,2) April/May 2006, p. 3
Partial reprint appears in Cactus Clippings, May/June 2006, p. 29
Partial reprint appears in USGA Green Section Record, 44(4) July/August 2006, p. 9-12
Partial reprint appears in Golf Course Management, 74(10) October 2006, p. 102-105
Reprint appears in Australian Turfgrass Management, 9(3) May/June 2007, p. 42-45
Summary as abstract
Pictures, color
Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Harman, G. E., E. B. Nelson, and K. L. Ondik. 2006. Fungicide application effects on non-target microbial populations of putting greens. USGA Turfgrass Environ. Res. Online. 5(7):p. [1-6].
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Web URL(s):
http://usgatero.msu.edu/v05/n07.pdf
    Last checked: 10/24/2016
    Requires: PDF Reader
https://web.archive.org/web/20080723091115/http://agcsa.com.au/static/atm_articles/html/9_3_3b.html
    Last checked: 10/24/2016
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Notes: Australian Turfgrass Management reprint
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MSU catalog number: SB 433 .A1 A65 [online]
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