Full TGIF Record # 112969
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DOI:10.1080/01904160600689308
Web URL(s):http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/01904160600689308
    Last checked: 11/04/2015
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    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Brink, G. E.; Sistani, K. R.; Oldham, J. L.; Pederson, G. A.
Author Affiliation:Brink: United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Madison, Wisconsin, United States; Sistani: United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky, United States; Oldham: Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi, United States; Pederson: United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit, Griffin, Georgia, United States
Title:Maturity effects on mineral concentration and uptake in annual ryegrass
Source:Journal of Plant Nutrition. Vol. 29, No. 6, June 2006, p. 1143-1155.
# of Pages:13
Publishing Information:New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Maturity stage; Minerals; Mineral nutrition; Lolium multiflorum; Grasslands; Effluent water use; Animal manures; Nitrogen fertilizers
Cultivar Names:Marshall
Abstract/Contents:"Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) provides livestock feed and captures nutrients from fields receiving manure application. The objective of this study was to determine relationships among maturity and yield, mineral uptake, and mineral concentration. Primary spring growth of 'Marshall' ryegrass was harvested every 7 d to 56 d maturity and was fertilized with swine effluent containing 254 and 161 kg nitrogen (N) and 42 and 26 kg phosphorus (P) ha-1 for two years. Yield increased linearly to a maximum of 13.6 mg ha-1 after 49 d in 2001 and 8.0 mg ha-1 after 56 d in 2002. Mineral uptake was highly correlated (r>0.95) with yield and attained a maximum single harvest of 192 kg N ha-1 and 32 kg P ha-1 (mean of two years). Concentration of all minerals except calcium (Ca) declined as ryegrass matured. Low magnesium (Mg) concentration (<2 g kg-1 dry matter) increases the risk of hypomagnesemic grass tetany."
Language:English
References:22
Note:Tables
Graphs
See Also:Other items relating to: Effluent Water Use
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Brink, G. E., K. R. Sistani, J. L. Oldham, and G. A. Pederson. 2006. Maturity effects on mineral concentration and uptake in annual ryegrass. J. Plant Nutr. 29(6):p. 1143-1155.
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DOI: 10.1080/01904160600689308
Web URL(s):
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/01904160600689308
    Last checked: 11/04/2015
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: QK 867 .J67
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