Full TGIF Record # 116095
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DOI:10.1080/01904160600848870
Web URL(s):http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ftinterface~content=a756776551~fulltext=713240930
    Last checked: 10/02/2006
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http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ftinterface~content=a756776551~fulltext=713240928
    Last checked: 10/02/2006
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Deifel, Kurt S.; Kopittke, Peter M.; Menzies, Neal W.
Author Affiliation:School of Land and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Saint Lucia, Australia
Title:Growth response of various perennial grasses to increasing salinity
Source:Journal of Plant Nutrition. Vol. 29, No. 9, 2006, p. 1573-1584.
# of Pages:12
Publishing Information:New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Salinity; Growth factors; Osmotic adjustment; Salt tolerance; Variety trials; Nutrient balance; Growth rate; Calcium deficiency; Calcium; Perennial grasses; Sodium chloride
Abstract/Contents:"Although the effect of salinity on plant growth has been the focus of a substantive research effort, much of this research has failed adequately to seperate the various growth-limiting aspects of salinity; thus, the results are confounded by multiple factors. Eight perennial grass species were grown in a sand-culture system dominated by sodium chloride (NaCl) [electrical conductivities (ECs) between 1.4 and 38 dS m-1], with sufficient calcium (Ca) added to each treatment to ensure that Na-induced Ca deficiency did not reduce growth. Of the eight perennial grass species examined, Chloris gayana cv. 'Pioneer' (Rhodes grass) was the most salt-tolerant species, while Chrysopogon zizanioides cv. 'Monto' (vetiver) was of only moderate tolerance. However, observed salinity tolerances tended to be lower than those expected from published values based on the threshold-salinity (bent-stick) model. This discrepancy may be due in part to differences in the evapotranspirational demand between studies; i.e., an increase in deman accelerates the accumulation of sodium (Na) in the shoots and hence decreases apparent salinity tolerance. It was also observed that the use of a non-saline growth period (to allow seed germination and establishment) results in the overestimation of vegetative salinity tolerance if not taken into consideration. This situation is particularly true for species of low salt tolerance, due to their comparatively rapid growth in the non-saline medium compared with growth at full salinity."
Language:English
References:17
Note:Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Deifel, K. S., P. M. Kopittke, and N. W. Menzies. 2006. Growth response of various perennial grasses to increasing salinity. J. Plant Nutr. 29(9):p. 1573-1584.
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DOI: 10.1080/01904160600848870
Web URL(s):
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ftinterface~content=a756776551~fulltext=713240930
    Last checked: 10/02/2006
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: PDF Version
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ftinterface~content=a756776551~fulltext=713240928
    Last checked: 10/02/2006
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: QK 867 .J67
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