Full TGIF Record # 131015
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Web URL(s):https://web.archive.org/web/20120915042540/http://www2.gcsaa.org/GCM/2007/dec/pdfs/microorganisms.pdf
    Last checked: 08/08/2016
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https://archive.lib.msu.edu/tic/gcman/article/2007dec84.pdf
    Last checked: 09/30/2008
    Requires: PDF Reader
Publication Type:
i
Professional
Author(s):Hixson, Adam C.; Weber, Jerome B.; Yelverton, Fred H.; Shi, Wei
Author Affiliation:Hixson: Ph.D. Student; Weber: Emeritus Professor, Yelverton: Professor, and Extension Specialist, Department of Crop Science; Shi: Assistant Professor, Department of Soil Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina
Title:Soil microorganisms: Your underground assistants: In established turfgrass systems, pesticides can bind to organic matter and degrade in the soil instead of being lost through runoff and leaching that contaminates groundwater and surface water
Section:Research
Other records with the "Research" Section
Source:Golf Course Management. Vol. 75, No. 12, December 2007, p. 84-90.
# of Pages:7
Publishing Information:Lawrence, KS: Golf Course Superintendents Association of America
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Soil microorganisms; Pesticides; Organic matter; Surface runoff; Leaching; Groundwater contamination; Pesticide degradation; Cynodon dactylon; Soils; Simazine
Abstract/Contents:Presents a study conducted at North Carolina State University to compare "pesticide degradation characteristics in turfgrass soil systems containing differing amounts of organic matter." Details the materials and methods used in the study, stating that "degradation characteristics of simazine in surface soil (0-2 inches [0-5 centimeters] deep) and subsoil (2-6 inches [5-15 centimeters] deep) of bermudagrass fairways were determined using laboratory techniques. A simazine solution radio-labeled with carbon-14 was prepared with commercial-grade simazine to be applied to the soil." Reports that "simazine added to sterile soil that had no microbial activity showed substantial potential for binding to organic matter. Simazine's binding capacity was directly related to organic matter." Concludes that "superintendents must make it a priority to educate their green committees, golfers, surrounding homeowners and the general public about how turfgrass is consistent with environmental stewardship."
Language:English
References:13
Note:Pictures, color
Figures
Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Hixson, A. C., J. B. Weber, F. H. Yelverton, and W. Shi. 2007. Soil microorganisms: Your underground assistants: In established turfgrass systems, pesticides can bind to organic matter and degrade in the soil instead of being lost through runoff and leaching that contaminates groundwater and surface water. Golf Course Manage. 75(12):p. 84-90.
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Web URL(s):
https://web.archive.org/web/20120915042540/http://www2.gcsaa.org/GCM/2007/dec/pdfs/microorganisms.pdf
    Last checked: 08/08/2016
    Requires: PDF Reader
https://archive.lib.msu.edu/tic/gcman/article/2007dec84.pdf
    Last checked: 09/30/2008
    Requires: PDF Reader
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MSU catalog number: b2193862a
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