Full TGIF Record # 152334
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DOI:10.1007/s11104-008-9810-2
Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11104-008-9810-2/fulltext.html
    Last checked: 10/04/2017
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https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11104-008-9810-2.pdf
    Last checked: 10/04/2017
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Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Pilon, Rémi; Revaillot, Sandrine; Jestin, Michel; Dawson, Lorna
Author Affiliation:Picon-Cochard, Pilon and Revaillot: Grassland Ecosystem Research Team, Institut National de la Recherché Agronomique, Clermont-Ferrand; Jestin: Unitd'e de Recherche sur les Herbivores, Institut National de la Recherché Agronomique, Saint Genés-Champanelle, France; Dawson: Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Title:Use of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict the precentage of dead versus living grass roots
Source:Plant and Soil. Vol. 317, No. 1,2, April 2009, p. 309-320.
# of Pages:12
Publishing Information:Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Related Web URL:http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11104-008-9810-2
    Last checked: 02/07/2014
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Analytical methods; Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy; Root growth; Roots
Abstract/Contents:"We tested the potential of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict the percentage of dead versus living roots of five grass species grown in monocultures under field conditions. Root death was induced after total severance of aboveground vegetation. Root samples were collected immediately after this treatment to obtain predominantly live roots (L), and then one (D1) and two months (D2) to obtain dead roots. NIRS spectra of L samples were different from D1 and D2 samples for four of the five species. The percentage of live and dead roots and root C and N were significantly predicted by NIRS. Validation of live and dead root percentage calibration was achieved with an error of prediction of 15%. These results show the potential of NIRS to predict the percentage of dead and live roots under field conditions and open up new opportunities in estimating more accurately below-ground net primary production of grasslands."
Language:English
References:53
Note:Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Picon-Cochard, C., R. Pilon, S. Revaillot, M. Jestin, and L. Dawson. 2009. Use of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict the precentage of dead versus living grass roots. Plant Soil. 317(1,2):p. 309-320.
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DOI: 10.1007/s11104-008-9810-2
Web URL(s):
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11104-008-9810-2/fulltext.html
    Last checked: 10/04/2017
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-acess website
https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11104-008-9810-2.pdf
    Last checked: 10/04/2017
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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