Full TGIF Record # 160840
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Web URL(s):http://caplter.asu.edu/docs/symposia/symp2009/Program.pdf#page=25
    Last checked: 03/03/2016
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Turner, V. K.
Author Affiliation:School of Geographical Sciences, Arizona State University., Tempe, AZ
Title:The impact of semi-private social institutions on residential landscape form and ecological structure in Phoenix, Arizona
Meeting Info.:Arizona State University, AZ: January 15, 2009
Source:Central Arizona - Phoenix Long Term Ecological Research Eleventh Annual Poster Symposium. January 2009, p. 25.
# of Pages:1
Publishing Information:Phoenix, AZ: Central Arizona - Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research
Related Web URL:http://caplter.asu.edu/docs/symposia/symp2009/Turner.pdf
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Keywords:TIC Keywords: Evaluations; Homeowner's associations; Landscape design; Legislation; Urban landscaping
Abstract/Contents:"A majority of new homes on the urban fringe of US metropolitan areas are managed by legal entities called homeowner associations (HOAs). HOAs exercise authority by virtue of their covenants, codes, and restrictions (CC&Rs), and increasingly these CC&Rs regulate the nature of residential landscapes in American cities. On the one hand, HOAs have been framed as an efficient and innovative response to both the developers desire to efficiently sell a community of homes to the consumers demand for amenties. On the other, they have been criticized as segregating entities that insulate residents from social-ills and economic stressors felt by populations living outside their bounds. Past research has examined the role of HOAs in social control and urban governance, but little attention has been paid to the effects of their regulations on residential landscape ecology. Although little is known about the range of landscape packages and management options available to homeowners, their potential impact on landscape form, and therefore function, is potentially great. In addition to regulating architectural characteristics, CC&Rs specify the types of plants allowed and whether they receive water or chemical inputs. Residential yards can be conceptualized as managed landscapes with characteristics similar to agricultural lands. A sampling of CC&Rs from the Phoenix metropolitan area was gathered and coded for regulations relating to landscape form and function in order to determine the ways in which HOAs govern the ecological structure and management of residential landscapes. This information was then used to address the potential consequences of HOA management practices on urban residential landscape form and function."
Language:English
References:0
Geographic Terms:Phoenix, Arizona
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Turner, V. K. 2009. The impact of semi-private social institutions on residential landscape form and ecological structure in Phoenix, Arizona. Central Arizona - Phoenix Long Term Ecological Research Eleventh Annual Poster Symposium. p. 25.
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Web URL(s):
http://caplter.asu.edu/docs/symposia/symp2009/Program.pdf#page=25
    Last checked: 03/03/2016
    Requires: PDF REader
    Access conditions: Document is within a single large file
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