Full TGIF Record # 174879
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DOI:10.1086/648603
Web URL(s):http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/648603
    Last checked: 01/21/2011
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/648603.pdf?acceptTC=true
    Last checked: 01/21/2011
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Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Thompson, Sally E.; Daniels, Karen E.
Author Affiliation:Thompson: Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Daniels: Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina
Title:A porous convection model for grass patterns
Source:American Naturalist. Vol. 175, No. 1, January 2010, p. E10-E15.
# of Pages:6
Publishing Information:Salem, Mass.: Essex Institute
Related Web URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/info/10.1086/648603
    Last checked: 01/21/2011
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Ecological distribution; Percent living ground cover; Porosity; Soil moisture; Convection; Winter injury
Abstract/Contents:"Spatial ecological patterns are usually ascribed to Turingtype reaction-diffusion or scale-dependent feedback processes, but morphologically indistinguishable patterns can be produced by instabilities in fluid flow. We present a new hypothesis that suggests that fluid convection and chill damage to plants could form vegetation patterns with wavelengths ≅1-2 times the plant height. Previous hypotheses for small-scale vegetation pattern formation relied on a Turing process driven by competition for water, which is thought to occur in large vegetation patterns. Predictions of the new hypothesis were consistent with properties of natural grass patterns in North Carolina, contradicting the Turing hypothesis. These results indicate that similarities in pattern morphology should not be interpreted as implying similarities in the pattern-forming processes, that small-wavelength vegetation patterns may arise from mechanisms that are distinct from those generating long-wavelength vegetation patterns, and that fluid instabilities should be recognized as a cause of ecological patterns."
Language:English
References:26
Note:Figures
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Thompson, S. E., and K. E. Daniels. 2010. A porous convection model for grass patterns. American Naturalist. 175(1):p. E10-E15.
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DOI: 10.1086/648603
Web URL(s):
http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/648603
    Last checked: 01/21/2011
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/648603.pdf?acceptTC=true
    Last checked: 01/21/2011
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: QH 1 .A5
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