Full TGIF Record # 191901
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1177/1754337110396014
Web URL(s):http://pip.sagepub.com/content/225/2/75.full.pdf+html
    Last checked: 11/02/2011
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Notes: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Bartlett, M. D.; James, I. T.
Author Affiliation:Centre for Sports Surface Technology, Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK
Title:Are golf courses a source or sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide? A modelling approach
Source:Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers:Part P, Journal of Sports Engineering and Technology. Vol. 225, No. 2, June 2011, p. 75-83.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:London, England: Professional Engineering Publishing Limited
Related Web URL:http://pip.sagepub.com/content/225/2/75
    Last checked: 11/02/2011
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Athletic fields; Biodiversity; Carbon dioxide; Carbon footprint; Carbon sequestration; Carbon sinks; Climatic change; Engine emissions; Environmental management; Maintenance intensity
Abstract/Contents:"Sports facilities have been shown to have a positive impact on local biodiversity, quality of life, and the economy. Their impact on global carbon balances is less clearly understood. Increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) have been linked with global climate change. Currently there is a debate as to whether amenity turf is a net source or a net sink for atmospheric CO2. The turf grass of a natural sports pitch will sequester carbon through photosynthesis, but there are numerous emission sources associated with the management of turf which release CO2 into the atmosphere. These include the engines used to power mechanized operations such as mowing and spraying, the application of agrochemicals, including fertilizers, and the disposal of waste. In order to determine whether a real-world example of a sports facility was a source or sink of carbon a mechanistic mass balance model was developed. Analysis indicated that the areas of the golf course that received the most management attention were a net source of carbon emissions. The magnitude of these releases was significantly different on an equal-area basis (p < 0.01). The net carbon budget for turf grass areas across the whole golf course accounting for the sequestration by the turfgrass was -33.01 MgC/year. The mature trees that formed an integral part of the landscape of the modelled course had a significant impact on the net carbon balance, resulting in overall net sequestration of -177.3 MgC/year for the whole golf course, equivalent to -1.93 MgC/ha/year. The variability in the size, shape, and vegetation composition of different golf courses has a considerable impact on their net carbon balance, and the resultant environmental impact of sports facilities must be assessed on an individual basis."
Language:English
References:35
Note:Figures
Tables
Graphs
See Also:Other items relating to: Carbon sequestration of turf
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Bartlett, M. D., and I. T. James. 2011. Are golf courses a source or sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide? A modelling approach. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers:Part P, Journal of Sports Engineering and Technology. 225(2):p. 75-83.
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DOI: 10.1177/1754337110396014
Web URL(s):
http://pip.sagepub.com/content/225/2/75.full.pdf+html
    Last checked: 11/02/2011
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Notes: Item is within a limited-access website
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