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DOI:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00050.x
Web URL(s):http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00050.x/full
    Last checked: 11/21/2013
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http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00050.x/pdf
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Toran, Laura; Grandstaff, David
Author Affiliation:Department of Geology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Title:Variation of nitrogen concentrations in stormpipe discharge in a residential watershed
Section:Technical papers
Other records with the "Technical papers" Section
Source:Journal of the American Water Resources Association/AWRA. Vol. 43, No. 3, June 2007, p. 630-641.
# of Pages:12
Publishing Information:Minneapolis, Minnesota: American Water Resources Association
Related Web URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00050.x/abstract
    Last checked: 11/21/2013
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Nitrogen; Nitrogen fate; Nonpoint source pollution; Nutrient concentration; Surface runoff; Urban watersheds
Abstract/Contents:"Use of lawn chemicals in residential areas may contribute nonpoint source (NPS) pollutants, such as nutrients, pesticides, and herbicides to streams. We conducted a 2-year screening study of discharge in stormwater pipes in the Wissahickon Valley Watershed (suburban Philadelphia) using nitrogen as an indicator of lawn chemical use. Stormwater samples representing first flush and composite runoff were collected approximately twice a month using automatic samplers triggered by rise in water level during storms. The runoff collected by the stormpipes was from neighborhoods with 15-100 residences, and from 2 to 18 ha (5-45 acres). Several factors were examined to evaluate the effects on nitrate concentration. These factors included time of sampling (season), number of homes, total area, size of the storm, and time since last storm. Nitrate levels were generally less than 5 mg/l, but still above background in typical undeveloped areas. Concentrations were slightly higher in the first summer than during a drought in the second year, but the difference was not statistically significant. There was a positive correlation between size of the neighborhood (capture area) and peak concentration of nitrate. Storm characteristics (size of storm and time since last storm) did not correlate with nitrate concentrations. The variation in both space and time suggests that a more local control may be a factor. Although individual lawn chemical applications were not monitored, they may influence the timing of increased loading. Furthermore, the variability indicates that quarterly monitoring will not capture discharge characteristics of storm basins."
Language:English
References:25
Note:Maps
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Toran, L., and D. Grandstaff. 2007. Variation of nitrogen concentrations in stormpipe discharge in a residential watershed. Water Resour. Bull. 43(3):p. 630-641.
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DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00050.x
Web URL(s):
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00050.x/full
    Last checked: 11/21/2013
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00050.x/pdf
    Last checked: 11/21/2013
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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