Full TGIF Record # 234129
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DOI:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2012.00691.x
Web URL(s):http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2012.00691.x/full
    Last checked: 12/11/2013
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2012.00691.x/pdf
    Last checked: 12/11/2013
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Polebitski, Austin S.; Palmer, Richard N.
Author Affiliation:Polebitski: Research Assistant Professor and Department Head; Palmer: Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Massachusetts - Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts
Title:Analysis and predictive models of single-family customer response to water curtailments during drought
Source:Journal of the American Water Resources Association/AWRA. Vol. 49, No. 1, February 2013, p. 40-51.
# of Pages:12
Publishing Information:Minneapolis, Minnesota: American Water Resources Association
Related Web URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2012.00691.x/abstract
    Last checked: 12/11/2013
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Customer relations; Drought management; Futures; Planning; Water use legislation
Abstract/Contents:"This research investigates customer response to demand management strategies during two drought periods in the City of Seattle. An analysis of customer response to voluntary water curtailments is conducted using k-means clustering to identify like groups of customers and behavior patterns. The clustering method identified important variables (household income, lot size, living space, and family size) useful in determining customer response to water curtailments. Ordinary least squares and spatial lag regression models are estimated using the first and second principal components of variables identified in the clustering analysis. Larger values of income, lot size, and living space enhanced water reductions whereas larger family size tended to reduce the effectiveness of curtailments. Projections of changes in Seattles built environment and demographics between 2000 and 2030 were obtained from an urban simulation model (UrbanSim) and were processed through the regression models to investigate changes in future curtailment effectiveness. This research found that increasing household size hardened demands (decreased curtailment effectiveness) whereas decreasing household size increased per-capita curtailment effectiveness. These results suggest that changes in the number of residents within a home is likely to be the most important factor in determining future curtailment effectiveness."
Language:English
References:38
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Polebitski, A. S., and R. N. Palmer. 2013. Analysis and predictive models of single-family customer response to water curtailments during drought. Water Resour. Bull. 49(1):p. 40-51.
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DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-1688.2012.00691.x
Web URL(s):
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2012.00691.x/full
    Last checked: 12/11/2013
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-1688.2012.00691.x/pdf
    Last checked: 12/11/2013
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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