Full TGIF Record # 235280
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DOI:10.1007/s11104-013-1879-6
Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-013-1879-6/fulltext.html
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
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Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Bowatte, Saman; Newton, Paul C. D.; Theobald, Phil; Brock, Shona; Hunt, Chris; Lieffering, Mark; Sevier, Scott; Gebbie, Steve; Luo, Dongwen
Author Affiliation:Bowatte, Newton, Theobald, Brock, Hunt, Lieffering and Luo: AgResearch Limited, Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North; Sevier and Gebbie: AgResearch Lincoln Research Centre, Christchurch, New Zealand
Title:Emissions of nitrous oxide from the leaves of grasses
Source:Plant and Soil. Vol. 374, No. 1-2, January 2014, p. 275-283.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Related Web URL:http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-013-1879-6
    Last checked: 01/22/2014
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Emissions; Holcus lanatus; Lolium perenne; Measurement; Nitrous oxide; Paspalum dilatatum; Poa annua
Abstract/Contents:"Aims Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from pastoral agriculture are considered to originate from the soil as a consequence of microbial activity during soil nitrification and denitrification. However, recent studies have identified the plant canopy as a potentially significant source of N2O emissions to the atmosphere. Understanding the extent and mechanisms of plant emissions may provide new mitigation opportunities as current options only target soil microbial processes. Methods We developed an experimental apparatus and protocol to partition N2O emissions between the leaves of grasses and the soil and measured emissions from ten common grass species found in New Zealand pastures. Results The chamber design enabled us to identify measurable changes in N2O concentration over a period of 1 h and to distinguish a range of emissions from 0.001 to 0.25 mg N2O -N/m2 leaf area/h. There was a 10-fold variation among species; Holcus lanataus, Lolium perenne and Paspalum dilatatum had the highest leaf N2O emissions and Poa annua the lowest. Conclusions Grasses do emit N2O from their leaves and the rate that this occurs varies among grass species. The emission does not appear to arise from formation of N2O in plant leaves but more likely reflects transport of N2O from the soil. Differences in emission rates appear to arise from a plant influence on the rate of formation of N2O in the soil rather than the rate of transportation through the plant."
Language:English
References:25
Note:Schematics
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Bowatte, S., P. C. D. Newton, P. Theobald, S. Brock, C. Hunt, M. Lieffering, et al. 2014. Emissions of nitrous oxide from the leaves of grasses. Plant Soil. 374(1-2):p. 275-283.
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DOI: 10.1007/s11104-013-1879-6
Web URL(s):
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-013-1879-6/fulltext.html
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11104-013-1879-6.pdf
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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