Full TGIF Record # 237862
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DOI:10.1007/BF02844054
Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2FBF02844054.pdf
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Smith, Neal; Dyson, R.; Janaway, L.
Author Affiliation:Smith and Dyson: Sport, Excercise and Health Sciences, University College Chichester, Chichester, West Sussex; Janaway: Brunel Institute for Bioengineering, Brunel University, UK
Title:Ground reaction force measures when running in soccer boots and soccer training shoes on a natural turf surface
Source:Sports Engineering. Vol. 7, No. 3, September 2004, p. 159-167.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:[Oxford, England]: Blackwell Science
Related Web URL:https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02844054
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Evaluations; Footwear; Impact tests; Soccer
Abstract/Contents:"There are differences in ground reaction force when wearing soccer boots compared with training shoes on a natural turf surface. Two natural-turf-covered force platforms, located outdoors in a field, allowed comparison of performance when six-studded soccer boots and soccer training shoes were worn during straight fast running (5.4 m s-1 ± 0.27 m s-1) and slow running (4.4 ms-1 ± 0.22 m s-1). Six male soccer players (mean age: 25 ± 4.18 years; mean mass 79.7 ± 9.32 kg) struck the first platform with the right foot and the second platform with the left foot. In fast running, the mean vertical impact peak was significantly greater in soccer boots (2.706 BW) than in training shoes (2.496 BW) when both the right and left foot were considered together and averaged (P = 0.003). Similarly, the mean vertical impact peak loading rate was greater when wearing soccer boots at 26.09 BWs-1 compared to training shoes (21.32 BWs-1; P = 0.002). Notably, the mean vertical impact peak loading rate of the left foot (boots: 28.07 BWs-1; shoes: 22.52 BWs-1) was significantly greater than the right foot (boots: 24.11 BWs-1; shoes: 20.11 BWs-1) in both boots and shoes (P = 0.018). The braking force was greater for the left foot (P = 0.013). In contrast, mean peak vertical propulsion forces were greater for the right foot (P < 0.001) when either soccer boots or training shoes were considered. Similar significant trends were evident in slow running, and, notably, in both soccer boots and training shoes medial forces were greater for the left foot (P = 0.008) and lateral forces greater for the right foot (P = 0.011). This study showed the natural turf ground reaction force measurement system can highlight differences in footwear in an ecological environment. Greater forces and impact loading rates occurred during running activity in soccer boots than in training shoes, with soccer boots showing reduced shock attenuation at impact. Such findings may have implications for impact-related injuries with sustained exposure, especially on harder natural-turf surfaces. There were differences in the forces occurring at the right and left feet with the ground, thus suggesting the use of bipedal monitoring of ground reaction forces."
Language:English
References:19
Note:Pictures, b/w
Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Smith, N., R. Dyson, and L. Janaway. 2004. Ground reaction force measures when running in soccer boots and soccer training shoes on a natural turf surface. Sports Engineering. 7(3):p. 159-167.
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DOI: 10.1007/BF02844054
Web URL(s):
https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2FBF02844054.pdf
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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