Full TGIF Record # 242011
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DOI:10.1071/AP07077
Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1071/AP07077.pdf
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
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Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Wang, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Qiang, Sheng; Zhu, Yun-zhi; Xu, Lang-lai
Author Affiliation:Wang, Qiang, Zhu, and Xu: College of Life Science, Nanjing Agricultural University; Wang: Institute of Food Safety; Zhang: Institute of Biotechnology, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing; Wang: College of Life Science, Henan University, Kaifeng, China
Title:Effects of epicuticular wax from Digitaria sanguinalis and Festuca arundinacea on infection by Curvularia eragrostidis
Source:Australasian Plant Pathology. Vol. 37, No. 1, January 2008, p. 43-52.
# of Pages:10
Publishing Information:Clayton, Vic. : Australian Plant Pathology Society
Related Web URL:https://link.springer.com/article/10.1071/AP07077
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Curvularia eragrostidis; Digitaria sanguinalis; Festuca arundinacea; Host plant resistance
Abstract/Contents:"Epicuticular wax is a plants initial defence system to various foreign invasions, including invasion by fungi. In this study, we investigated the effect of epicuticular wax of Digitaria sanguinalis and Festuca arundinacea on invasion by the fungus Curvularia eragrostidis and the difference in components of epicuticular waxes between the two plants. The epicuticular wax of D. sanguinalis (host) significantly enhanced the growth of germ tubes of C. eragrostidis conidia, but had no effect on appressorium formation. However, the epicuticular wax of F. arundinacea (non-host) inhibited the extension of germ tubes and the differentiation of appressoria. Analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry indicated that the constituents of these two epicuticular waxes were remarkably different. Among the 24 and 21 compounds found in the wax of D. sanguinalis and F. arundinacea, respectively, only four were the same. (Z,Z)-9,12-Octadecadien-1-ol constituted 54.3% of the total wax of D. sanguinalis, while 9-tricosene accounted for 49.8% of the total waxes of F. arundinacea. Furthermore, an extracellular esterase preparation from C. eragrostidis conidia could completely degrade the epicuticular wax of D. sanguinalis after 4 h incubation at 25° C, but only partially degrade the wax from F. arundinacea. These results suggest that the components of the wax and their chemical characteristics are important in determining how effectively these plants are able to combat invasion of C. eragrostidis."
Language:English
References:44
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Wang, F., P. Zhang, S. Qiang, Y.-z. Zhu, and L.-l. Xu. 2008. Effects of epicuticular wax from Digitaria sanguinalis and Festuca arundinacea on infection by Curvularia eragrostidis. Australas. Plant Pathol. 37(1):p. 43-52.
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DOI: 10.1071/AP07077
Web URL(s):
https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1071/AP07077.pdf
    Last checked: 10/05/2017
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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