Full TGIF Record # 242072
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1016/j.scienta.2014.02.005
Web URL(s):http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304423814000788
    Last checked: 05/21/2014
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Yang, Zhimin; Miao, Yuchun; Yu, Jingjin; Liu, Jun; Huang, Bingru
Author Affiliation:Yang, Miao, Yu, and Liu: College of Agro-Grassland Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China; Huang: Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey
Title:Differential growth and physiological responses to heat stress between two annual and two perennial cool-season turfgrasses
Source:Scientia Horticulturae. Vol. 170, May 7 2014, p. 75-81.
# of Pages:7
Publishing Information:Amsterdam, Elsevier
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Cultivar evaluation; Differential assessment; Heat stress; Lolium multiflorum; Lolium perenne; Physiological responses; Poa annua; Poa trivialis; Quality evaluation
Cultivar Names:Panterra; Njpl; Premier; Sabre
Abstract/Contents:"Heat stress is a major limiting factor for the growth of cool-season turfgrass species. The objective of this study was to compare growth and physiological responses to heat stress between annual and perennial cool-season grass species. Two annual grass species, annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum, cv. 'Panterra') and annual bluegrass (Poa annua, ecotype 'Njpl') and two perennial grass species, perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne, cv. 'Premier') and rough bluegrass (Poa trivialis, cv. 'Sabre') were exposed to three temperature regimes in growth chambers: optimal temperature control (20/15°C day/night), moderate heat stress (10°C above the control), and severe heat stress (20°C above the control). Moderate heat stress did not cause significant physiological damages in any of the four grass species. Severe heat stress caused significant decline in turf quality (TQ), leaf relative water content (RWC), antioxidant enzyme (catalase) activity, membrane stability (EL), and resulted in severe membrane lipid peroxidation (MDA) in all four grass species. All these parameters in the two annual grass species were more responsive to severe heat stress, suggesting that the two annual species were less heat tolerant or more heat sensitive than the two perennial species. Differential heat responses between the two annual and two perennial grass species could be associated with the differences in the severity of leaf senescence, as manifested by TQ, EL, and MDA."
Language:English
References:28
Note:Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Yang, Z., Y. Miao, J. Yu, J. Liu, and B. Huang. 2014. Differential growth and physiological responses to heat stress between two annual and two perennial cool-season turfgrasses. Scientia Horticulturae. 170:p. 75-81.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.scienta.2014.02.005
Web URL(s):
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304423814000788
    Last checked: 05/21/2014
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: b4895016~S1a
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