Full TGIF Record # 242184
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DOI:10.1111/grs.12034
Web URL(s):https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/grs.12034
    Last checked: 07/13/2018
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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/grs.12034
    Last checked: 07/13/2018
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Tedder, Michelle; Kirkman, Kevin; Morris, Craig; Fynn, Richard
Author Affiliation:Tedder, Kirkman, and Fynn: Grassland Science, School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal; Morris: Agricultural Research Council, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa; Fynn: Okvango Research Institute, University of Botswana, Maun, Botswana
Title:Tree-grass competition along a catenal gradient in a mesic grassland, South Africa
Source:Grassland Science. Vol. 60, No. 1, March 2014, p. 1-8.
# of Pages:8
Publishing Information:Oxford, England: Blackwell Pub.
Related Web URL:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/grs.12034
    Last checked: 07/13/2018
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Choice of species; Grasslands; Growth and development; Growth factors; Root depth; Tree root competition
Abstract/Contents:"The interaction, both above and belowground, between tree saplings and the surrounding grass sward is dependent on solar radiation, temperature, rainfall, soil depth, tree species and sward composition. These factors, as well as level of sward defoliation, influence whether the system will remain as savanna or move towards a woodland or grassland state. The effects of above- and belowground competition between grasses and two Acacia species and the effects of soil depth on these interactions were examined by planting A. karroo and A. nilotica seedlings into a natural sward on three different soil depths. Three aboveground treatments: full shading, reduced shading by tying back the neighboring grasses and reduced shading by clipping, and two belowground treatments: full and no belowground competition, were used. Plant size increased with increasing soil depth, while belowground competitive intensity was unaffected. Removing belowground competition increased sapling biomass by half (P < 0.05) on all soil depths. By contrast, reduced shading had little effect at all soil depths, whereas sward clipping increased sapling biomass (47%) on shallow soils only (P = 0.027), indicating that encroachment on shallow soils may result from factors that decrease root vigor of the surrounding grasses rather than light competition. Irrespective of soil depth, root competition appeared to be the major factor influencing sapling growth rates, thus grazing management practices that reduce grass root productivity are expected to result in woody encroachment."
Language:English
References:41
Note:Tables
Graphs
Geographic Terms:South Africa
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Tedder, M., K. Kirkman, C. Morris, and R. Fynn. 2014. Tree-grass competition along a catenal gradient in a mesic grassland, South Africa. Grassland Science. 60(1):p. 1-8.
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DOI: 10.1111/grs.12034
Web URL(s):
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/grs.12034
    Last checked: 07/13/2018
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/grs.12034
    Last checked: 07/13/2018
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: b4979016~S1a
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