Full TGIF Record # 246406
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DOI:10.1111/jawr.12133
Web URL(s):http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jawr.12133/full
    Last checked: 07/02/2014
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http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jawr.12133/pdf
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Ouyang, Yun; Wentz, Elizabeth A.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Harlan, Sharon L.
Author Affiliation:Ouyang: Ph.D. Candidate, School of Sustainability; Wentz: Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning; Harlan: School of Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe; Ruddell: College of Technology and Innovation, Arizona State University, Mesa, Arizona
Title:A multi-scale analysis of single-family residential water use in the Phoenix metropolitan area
Section:Additional technical papers
Other records with the "Additional technical papers" Section
Source:Journal of the American Water Resources Association/AWRA. Vol. 50, No. 2, April 2014, p. 448-467.
# of Pages:20
Publishing Information:Minneapolis, Minnesota: American Water Resources Association
Related Web URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jawr.12133/abstract
    Last checked: 07/02/2014
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Irrigation practices; Urban habitat; Water use; Water use restrictions
Abstract/Contents:"Studies that evaluate determinants of residential water demand typically use data from a single spatial scale. Although household-scale data are preferred, especially when econometric models are used, researchers may be limited to aggregate data. There is little, if any, empirical analysis to assess whether spatial scale may lead to ecological fallacy problems in residential water use research. Using linear mixed-effects models, we compare the results for the relationship of single-family water use with its determinants using data from the household and census tract scales in the city of Phoenix. Model results between the household and census tract scale are similar suggesting the ecological fallacy may not be significant. Common significant determinants on these two spatial scales include household size, household income, house age, pool size, irrigable lot size, precipitation, and temperature. We also use city/town scale data from the Phoenix metropolitan area to parameterize the linear mixed-effects model. The difference in the parameter estimates of those common variables compared to the first two scales indicates there is spatial heterogeneity in the relationship between single-family water use and its determinants among cities and towns. The negative relationship between single-family house density and residential water use suggests that residential water consumption could be reduced through coordination of land use planning and water demand management."
Language:English
References:91
Note:Equations
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Ouyang, Y., E. A. Wentz, B. L. Ruddell, and S. L. Harlan. 2014. A multi-scale analysis of single-family residential water use in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Water Resour. Bull. 50(2):p. 448-467.
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DOI: 10.1111/jawr.12133
Web URL(s):
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jawr.12133/full
    Last checked: 07/02/2014
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jawr.12133/pdf
    Last checked: 07/02/2014
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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