Full TGIF Record # 248283
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Web URL(s):http://www.turf.uconn.edu/pdf/research/reports/2009%20UConn%20Annual%20Turf%20Report.pdf#page=100
    Last checked: 09/10/2014
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    Notes: Item is within a single large file
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Guillard, K.; Geng, X.; Mangiafico, S. S.; Kopp, K. L.; Barry, T. J.
Title:Objective testing methods to guide nitrogen fertilization of turfgrass that reduce threats to water quality
Section:Scientific publications (abstracts & citations)
Other records with the "Scientific publications (abstracts & citations)" Section
Source:2009 Annual Turfgrass Research Report [Connecticut]. 2010, p. 98.
# of Pages:1
Publishing Information:Storrs, Connecticut: Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Evaluative methods; Fertilizer recommendations; Nitrogen fertilization; Pollution; Soil testing; Turfgrass industry trends
Abstract/Contents:"Despite concerns with N fertilizer losses from turf, there has been relatively little research and improvements in traditional fertilization practices of turfgrass in the past 20 to 30 years. There are no reliable soil- or plant-based N tests used to guide N fertilization for turf on a routine basis. The majority of homeowners, lawncare companies, and turf managers still rely on decades-old fertilization recommendations and practices where N is applied on a schedule at a set rate (usually 49 kg N/ha at each application, three or four times a year) rather than being based on nutrient availability as measured by an objective testing method. This greatly increases the chance of over application of N and threatens water quality. Soil and plant tissue tests to guide N fertilization are routinely used in agricultural and horticultural crop production, and expected as part of nutrient and water quality management plans for most crops. Given current environmental and economic concerns with N fertilizers, it is almost inconceivable that no reliable or routine soil or plant tissue test is used guide turfgrass N fertilization. Current research at the University of Connecticut suggests that new technologies (anion-exchange membranes; handheld reflectance meters) or modifications to or application of existing testing methods and procedures (soil and plant tissue nitrate; soil animo sugar N) can predict turfgrass quality and growth responses. Implementation of these tests with turfgrass will provide an objective basis to guide N fertilization, resulting in a decreased risk of N pollution from excess application of fertilizers. Challenges to wide-scale adoption, however, include a lack of calibration data for various turfgrass species managed for different goals, and insufficient capability at some soil and plant tissue testing laboratories to perform certain tests on a routine basis."
Language:English
References:0
Note:"2009. Objective testing methods to guide nitrogen fertilization of turfgrass that reduce threats to water quality. Proceedings of the 2009 USDA-CSREES National Water Conference."
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Guillard, K., X. Geng, S. S. Mangiafico, K. L. Kopp, and T. J. Barry. 2010. Objective testing methods to guide nitrogen fertilization of turfgrass that reduce threats to water quality. Turfgrass Res. Rep. [Connecticut]. p. 98.
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Web URL(s):
http://www.turf.uconn.edu/pdf/research/reports/2009%20UConn%20Annual%20Turf%20Report.pdf#page=100
    Last checked: 09/10/2014
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Notes: Item is within a single large file
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