Full TGIF Record # 249460
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1016/j.agee.2011.09.008
Web URL(s):http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880911003331
    Last checked: 10/16/2014
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Kroes, J. G.; Supit, I.
Author Affiliation:Kroes: ESG-IW; Supit: ESS-CC, Wageningen UR, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Title:Impact analysis of drought, water excess and salinity on grass production in The Netherlands using historical and future climate data
Source:Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Environment. Vol. 144, No. 1, November 2011, p. 370-381.
# of Pages:12
Publishing Information:Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier Science Publishers
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Carbon dioxide; Drought stress; Groundwater; Growth studies; Irrigation requirements; Salinity stress; Water stress
Abstract/Contents:"The coupled SWAP-WOFOST model was used to study the effects of increasing salinity of groundwater, drought and water excess on grass production in The Netherlands. WOFOST simulates crop growth and SWAP simulates transport of water, solutes and heat in the vadose zone. The model was tested using several datasets from field experiments. We applied the models at regional scale where we quantified the impact of various groundwater salinity levels on grass growth and production using historical weather data (1971-2000). The salt concentrations in the subsoil were derived from the National Hydrological Instrument. The results show that salinity effects on grass production are limited. In wet years the excess rainfall will infiltrate the soil and reduce salt water seepage. In a next step we used future weather data for the year 2050, derived from 3 Global Circulation Models. From each model we used data from two CO2 emission scenarios. As expected higher temperatures increased drought stress, however, the production reduction as a result of salt water in the root zone is limited. Salt stress mainly occurred when irrigation was applied with saline water. The increased CO2 concentration in combination with the limited drought stress resulted in increasing simulated actual and potential yields. Overall conclusion for grassland in The Netherlands: drought stress is stronger than stress caused by water excess which on its turn is stronger than salinity stress. Future water demand for irrigation may increase by 11-19% and result in water scarcity if water supply is insufficient."
Language:English
References:79
Note:Tables
Graphs
Geographic Terms:The Netherlands
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Kroes, J. G., and I. Supit. 2011. Impact analysis of drought, water excess and salinity on grass production in The Netherlands using historical and future climate data. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 144(1):p. 370-381.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.agee.2011.09.008
Web URL(s):
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880911003331
    Last checked: 10/16/2014
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: b2322761
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