Full TGIF Record # 267369
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1080/1065657X.2015.1026005
Web URL(s):http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1065657X.2015.1026005
    Last checked: 12/03/2015
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/1065657X.2015.1026005
    Last checked: 12/03/2015
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Brown, Sally
Author Affiliation:School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Title:Greenhouse gas accounting for landfill diversion of food scraps and yard waste
Section:Reviews
Other records with the "Reviews" Section
Source:Compost Science & Utilization. Vol. 24, No. 1, 2016, p. 11-19.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
Related Web URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1065657X.2015.1026005
    Last checked: 12/03/2015
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Composts; Greenhouse gases; Landfills; Methane gas; Models; Pollution control; Waste management
Abstract/Contents:"Diverting organics from landfills to compost piles is generally recognized as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This article provides a detailed review of the Climate Action Reserve (CAR) and the U.S. EPA Waste Reduction Model (WARM) protocols on landfill diversion and composting for food scraps and yard waste. The primary benefits associated with diversion are methane avoidance. The equations used to quantify methane avoidance include first-order decay rate constants for different feedstocks to predict how quickly organics will decay. The total methane generation potential of the different feedstocks is also included. The equations include estimates of gas collection efficiencies in landfills. The decay rate constants have been determined from laboratory incubations and may not be representative of decomposition within a landfill. Estimates of gas capture efficiency have been improved and more closely reflect actual landfill conditions. Gas capture efficiency will vary based on landfill cover material, portion of the landfill where measurements take place, and whether the gas collection system is operational. Emissions during composting are included in these calculations. Only the WARM model includes a consideration of benefits for compost use. Nevertheless, significant benefits are recognized for landfill diversion of food scraps. The WARM model suggests that landfilling yard waste is superior to composting."
Language:English
References:42
Note:Equations
Tables
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Brown, S. 2016. Greenhouse gas accounting for landfill diversion of food scraps and yard waste. Compost Sci. Util. 24(1):p. 11-19.
Fastlink to access this record outside TGIF: https://tic.msu.edu/tgif/flink?recno=267369
If there are problems with this record, send us feedback about record 267369.
Choices for finding the above item:
DOI: 10.1080/1065657X.2015.1026005
Web URL(s):
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1065657X.2015.1026005
    Last checked: 12/03/2015
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/1065657X.2015.1026005
    Last checked: 12/03/2015
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Find Item @ MSU
MSU catalog number: b2801991a
Find from within TIC:
   Digitally in TIC by record number.
Request through your local library's inter-library loan service (bring or send a copy of this TGIF record)