Full TGIF Record # 268588
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2015.11.004
Web URL(s):http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204615002285
    Last checked: 02/08/2016
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Troy, Austin; Nunery, Ashley; Grove, J. Morgan
Author Affiliation:Troy: Denver Campus, University of Colorado, Denver, CO; Nunery: University of Vermont; Grove: USDA Forest Service
Title:The relationship between residential yard management and neighborhood crime: An analysis from Baltimore City and County
Source:Landscape and Urban Planning. Vol. 147, March 2016, p. 78-87.
# of Pages:10
Publishing Information:Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Depreciative behavior; Design factors; Evaluations; Landscape design; Lawn turf
Abstract/Contents:"We analyzed the relationship between crime and indicators of residential yard management in Baltimore City and County. Data came from a survey we conducted of over one thousand front yards that included more than 40 indicators relating to lawns, trees, shrubs, beds and other features. These indicators were related to point counts of crime at the 150 m scale using a combination of ordinary least squares, spatial error, and Poisson regressions. After controlling for income, population density, block-scale tree canopy, and housing type, we found a consistently significant relationship between crime and a number of indicators of yard management. Yard-level variables that were negatively associated with crime included: the presence of yard trees, garden hoses/sprinklers, and lawns, in addition to the percentage of pervious area in a yard. Those positively associated with crime included presence of litter, desiccation of the lawn, lack of cutting of the lawn, and number of small trees in front of or adjacent to the property. While these results do not establish causality, they add evidence to a growing literature that suggests the possibility of several mechanisms by which environmental design may reduce crime: "cues to care" (the inverse of the "broken window" hypothesis) can lead to reduced crime by signaling to criminals the presence of social capital and the active involvement of neighbors in community spaces; and more appealing landscaping draws more "eyes on the street," which in turn deters criminals."
Language:English
References:40
Note:Map
Tables
Geographic Terms:Baltimore
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Troy, A., A. Nunery, and J. M. Grove. 2016. The relationship between residential yard management and neighborhood crime: An analysis from Baltimore City and County. Landscape Urban Plan. 147:p. 78-87.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2015.11.004
Web URL(s):
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204615002285
    Last checked: 02/08/2016
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: b2322641
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