Full TGIF Record # 278851
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1016/j.ufug.2016.10.013
Web URL(s):http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866716301182
    Last checked: 12/08/2016
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Akpinar, Abdullah; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Brooks, Kerry R.
Author Affiliation:Akpinar: Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Landscape Architecture, Turkey; Barbosa-Leiker: College of Nursing, Washington State University, Spokane, WA, United States; Brooks: Department of Planning and Public Administration, Eastern Washington University, Spokane, WA, United States
Title:Does green space matter? Exploring relationships between green space type and health indicators
Source:Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. Vol. 20, December 1 2016, p. 407-418.
# of Pages:12
Publishing Information:Jena, Germany: Urban & Fischer
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Greenspace; Health benefits; Mental health; Questionnaire surveys; Urban habitat
Abstract/Contents:"This study explores whether general specification or specific types of green spaces are associated with mental and general health. A sample of 5,148 respondents from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, conducted in 2006 in Washington State across 98 zip-codes, was analyzed. Measures included mental health complaints (last 30 days), anxiety-depression complaints (last 14 days), and general health status. Percentage of green spaces was derived from the National Land Cover Dataset. The associations were examined in both total and subsamples (urban vs. rural zip-codes). Bivariate correlations and multilevel regression analysis controlling for age, sex, race, income, education level, size of green space, and zip-code population and socio-economic situation indicated aggregated green space was not associated with mental and general health. On the other hand, respondents in areas that have more forests report fewer days of mental health complaints in total sample. Results also revealed that more urban green space was associated with fewer days of mental health complaints in urban zip-codes. In addition, size of forest in urban areas was associated with fewer days of mental health complaints. Our findings suggest that types of green space should be considered individually rather than aggregated as simply green and size of forest in urban areas seems an important factor to affect the relationship between green space and mental health."
Language:English
References:66
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Akpinar, A., C. Barbosa-Leiker, and K. R. Brooks. 2016. Does green space matter? Exploring relationships between green space type and health indicators. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. 20:p. 407-418.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2016.10.013
Web URL(s):
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866716301182
    Last checked: 12/08/2016
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: b5268048~S1a
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