Full TGIF Record # 282404
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1007/s11104-015-2568-4
Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-015-2568-4
    Last checked: 04/04/2017
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited access website
https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11104-015-2568-4.pdf
    Last checked: 04/04/2017
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Pérez, L. I.; Gundel, P. E.; Omacini, M.
Author Affiliation:IFEVA-Facultad de Agronomía (UBA)/CONICET, Cátedra de Ecología, Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Argentina
Title:Can the defensive mutualism between grasses and fungal endophytes protect non-symbiotic neighbours from soil pathogens?
Section:Soil, plants and endophytes
Other records with the "Soil, plants and endophytes" Section
Source:Plant and Soil. Vol. 405, No. 1-2, August 2016, p. 289-298.
# of Pages:10
Publishing Information:Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Related Web URL:https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-015-2568-4#Abs1
    Last checked: 04/05/2017
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Endophyte-infected plants; Epichloe; Lolium multiflorum; Rhizoctonia solani
Abstract/Contents:"Background and aims: It is proposed that Epichloe^D" endophytes have a role protecting host grasses against pathogens. However, it is unclear whether this protection is extended to other non-symbiotic plants. Here we explored the effect of the asexual fungal symbiont, Epichlo¬®occultans, on the interaction between Lolium multiflorum host plants and soil pathogens, and its potential positive side-effect on neighbouring plants. Methods: We conducted two microcosm experiments to assess the endophyte effect on seedling establishment of the host grass and other non-symbiotic grasses in the presence of soil pathogens. With an in-vitro experiment, we tested whether the endophyte inhibits, during seed germination, the growth of these pathogens. Results: Independently of pathogen identity, the endophyte improved host establishment (6 %). The endophyte also enhanced the establishment of the neighbouring grass Bromus catharticus (‚ČÖ20 %) only in soil with Rhizoctonia solani. The endophyte in seed reduced the growth (‚ČÖ20 %) of two out of four pathogens (Fusarium acuminatum and R. solani). Conclusions: We conclude that asexual endophytes could protect host grasses against pathogens but most importantly, that they can have protective effects beyond their hosts. Since effects depended on pathogen and plant identity, more experiments are needed in order understand the ecological meaning of these positive side-effects."
Language:English
References:64
Note:Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Pérez, L. I., P. E. Gundel, and M. Omacini. 2016. Can the defensive mutualism between grasses and fungal endophytes protect non-symbiotic neighbours from soil pathogens?. Plant Soil. 405(1-2):p. 289-298.
Fastlink to access this record outside TGIF: https://tic.msu.edu/tgif/flink?recno=282404
If there are problems with this record, send us feedback about record 282404.
Choices for finding the above item:
DOI: 10.1007/s11104-015-2568-4
Web URL(s):
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-015-2568-4
    Last checked: 04/04/2017
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited access website
https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11104-015-2568-4.pdf
    Last checked: 04/04/2017
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Find Item @ MSU
MSU catalog number: b2212822
Find from within TIC:
   Digitally in TIC by record number.
Request through your local library's inter-library loan service (bring or send a copy of this TGIF record)