Full TGIF Record # 301067
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DOI:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2018.05.008
Web URL(s):https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204618303098
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Carrico, Amanda R.; Raja, Urooj S.; Fraser, Jim; Vandenbergh, Michael P.
Author Affiliation:Carrico and Raja: Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Fraser: Department of Human and Organizational Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Vandenbergh: Vanderbilt University Law School, Nashville, TN
Title:Household and block level influences on residential fertilizer use
Source:Landscape and Urban Planning. Vol. 178, October 2018, p. 60-68.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier
Related Web URL:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204618303098#ab010
    Last checked: 10/01/2018
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Environmental impact; Fertilization rates; Maintenance by homeowners; Nitrogen level; Suburban habitat; Urban habitat
Abstract/Contents:"Urban and suburban lawns make up a large share of land use in the US. Maintaining lawns to fulfill aesthetic norms has environmental consequences. In this analysis, we examine household decisions to apply nitrogen-containing lawn fertilizer. Using survey data of 298 households in Nashville, Tennessee, we first examine the prevalence of fertilizer use and the rate of annual nitrogen applied. We find that the resulting distribution is skewed, with the top 20% of the sample applying 56% of the total share of nitrogen. In contrast to this subset of 'intensive' fertilizers, 93% of households applied at or below levels recommended by landscaping professionals, challenging the assumption that the over-application of fertilizer is widespread. We employed multi-level modeling to examine the relative importance of household- and block-level characteristics on fertilizer use and the intensity of use. Consistent with prior work, we find that the desire for a green lawn is a significant predictor of fertilizer use. However, we also find that living on a wealthy block and living near others who value a green lawn independently predict fertilizer use. In addition, we observe that intensive fertilizing households tend to be less wealthy than others on their block, suggesting the possibility of an aspirational dimension to fertilizer use. Finally, we find evidence that environmental concern is associated with less intensive fertilizer use, suggesting that households may be willing to take some steps to mitigate the impact of their lawn care on the environment."
Language:English
References:62
Note:Map
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Carrico, A. R., U. S. Raja, J. Fraser, and M. P. Vandenbergh. 2018. Household and block level influences on residential fertilizer use. Landscape Urban Plan. 178:p. 60-68.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2018.05.008
Web URL(s):
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204618303098
    Last checked: 10/01/2018
    Requires: JavaScript
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204618303098/pdfft
    Last checked: 10/01/2018
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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