Full TGIF Record # 301068
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DOI:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2018.05.030
Web URL(s):https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204618304353
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Author(s):Locke, Dexter H.; Avolio, Meghan; Trammell, Tara L. E.; Chowdhury, Rinku Roy; Grove, J. Morgan; Rogan, John; Martin, Deborah G.; Bettez, Neil; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Groffman, Peter M.; Hall, Sharon J.; Heffernan, James B.; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Larson, Kelli L.; Morse, Jennifer L.; Neill, Christopher; Ogden, Laura A.; O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath P. M.; Pataki, Diane; Pearse, William D.; Polsky, Colin; Wheeler, Megan M.
Author Affiliation:Locke: National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), Annapolis, MD; Avolio: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Trammell: Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware; Chowdhury, Rogan, and Martin: Graduate School of Geography, Clark University, Worcester, MA; Grove: National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), Annapolis, MD and USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Baltimore Field Station; Bettez: Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies; Cavender-Bares and Hobbie: Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN; Groffman: Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and Advanced Science Research Center at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; Hall and Wheeler: School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; Heffernan: Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University; Larson: School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning and School of Sustainability, Arizona State University, AZ; Morse: Department of Environmental Science and Management, Portland State University; Neill: Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory; Ogden: Department of Anthropology, Dartmouth College; O'Neil-Dunne: Spatial Analysis Laboratory, Rubenstein School of Environment & Natural Resources, University of Vermont; Pataki: Department of Biology, University of Utah; Pearse: Department of Biology & Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT; Polsky: Center for Environmental Studies, Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL
Title:A multi-city comparison of front and backyard differences in plant species diversity and nitrogen cycling in residential landscapes
Source:Landscape and Urban Planning. Vol. 178, October 2018, p. 102-111.
# of Pages:10
Publishing Information:Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier
Related Web URL:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204618304353#ab010
    Last checked: 10/01/2018
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Comparisons; Diversity; Lawn turf; Nitrogen cycle; Urban habitat
Abstract/Contents:"We hypothesize that lower public visibility of residential backyards reduces households' desire for social conformity, which alters residential land management and produces differences in ecological composition and function between front and backyards. Using lawn vegetation plots (7 cities) and soil cores (6 cities), we examine plant species richness and evenness and nitrogen cycling of lawns in Boston, Baltimore, Miami, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Phoenix, Los Angeles (LA), and Salt Lake City (SLC). Seven soil nitrogen measures were compared because different irrigation and fertilization practices may vary between front and backyards, which may alter nitrogen cycling in soils. In addition to lawn-only measurements, we collected and analyzed plant species richness for entire yards-cultivated (intentionally planted) and spontaneous (self-regenerating)-for front and backyards in just two cities: LA and SLC. Lawn plant species and soils were not different between front and backyards in our multi-city comparisons. However, entire-yard plant analyses in LA and SLC revealed that frontyards had significantly fewer species than backyards for both cultivated and spontaneous species. These results suggest that there is a need for a more rich and social-ecologically nuanced understanding of potential residential, household behaviors and their ecological consequences."
Language:English
References:56
Note:Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Locke, D. H., M. Avolio, T. L. E. Trammell, R. R. Chowdhury, J. M. Grove, J. Rogan, et al. 2018. A multi-city comparison of front and backyard differences in plant species diversity and nitrogen cycling in residential landscapes. Landscape Urban Plan. 178:p. 102-111.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2018.05.030
Web URL(s):
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204618304353
    Last checked: 10/01/2018
    Requires: JavaScript
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204618304353/pdfft
    Last checked: 10/01/2018
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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