Full TGIF Record # 305708
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DOI:10.31274/farmprogressreports-180814-2046
Web URL(s):https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1399&context=farmprogressreports
    Last checked: 05/28/2019
    Requires: PDF Reader
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Mertz, Isaac; Christians, Nick; Thoms, Adam; Pease, Benjamin; Ervin, Erik; Zhang, Xunzhong
Author Affiliation:Mertz: Research Associate, Department of Horticulture, Iowa State University; Christians: University Professor, Department of Horticulture, Iowa State University; Thoms: Assistant Professor, Department of Horticulture, Iowa State University; Pease: Research Associate, Department of Horticulture, Iowa State University; Ervin: University Professor, Department of Horticulture, Virginia Polytechnic and State University; Zhang: Research Associate, Department of Horticulture, Virginia Polytechnic and State University
Title:Creeping bentgrass responses to a tryptophan-containing organic byproduct
Section:Horticulture station
Other records with the "Horticulture station" Section
Source:Farm Progress Reports [Iowa]. 2017, p. 65-67.
# of Pages:3
Publishing Information:Ames, Iowa: College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Agrostis stolonifera; Auxins; Evapotranspiration; Fermentation wastes; Host plant resistance; Plant growth regulators; Soil moisture; Tryptophan; Urea
Trade Names:Tryptophan byproduct (TRP-B)
Abstract/Contents:"Tryptophan is one of the 22 essential amino acids and serves as a building block for protein synthesis. Tryptophan also is a known precursor for auxin in plants. Previous research has shown that applying fertilizers amended with auxin coming from tryptophan may enhance plant defense chemical responses during limited soil moisture conditions. This occurs through increases in root production, as well as changes in endogenous hormone levels, resulting in plant growth regulating activity. Tryptophan is produced industrially through fermentation, and following that process, a byproduct remains. Tryptophan byproduct (TRP-B) is currently considered a waste product. However, the trace amounts of tryptophan and nitrogen containing compounds remaining in the byproduct following fermentation make it an intriguing subject for use as a growth promoter for turfgrasses. The objective of this research was to determine whether applications of TRP-B improve Penn A-4 creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) performance more than applications of pure tryptophan and/or urea."
Language:English
References:0
See Also:Updated version appears in Golf Course Management, 85(12) December 2017, p. 67-69, R=293873, with variant title "Responses of creeping bentgrass to an organic byproduct containing tryptophan". R=293873
Note:"RFR-A1713"
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Mertz, I., N. E. Christians, A. Thoms, B. Pease, E. Ervin, and X. Zhang. 2017. Creeping bentgrass responses to a tryptophan-containing organic byproduct. Farm Progress Reports [Iowa]. p. 65-67.
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DOI: 10.31274/farmprogressreports-180814-2046
Web URL(s):
https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1399&context=farmprogressreports
    Last checked: 05/28/2019
    Requires: PDF Reader
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