Full TGIF Record # 315250
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DOI:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2020.103836
Web URL(s):https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204619308163
    Last checked: 08/10/2021
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204619308163/pdfft?md5=5143cfb819a364cb041a81c5daa62a74&pid=1-s2.0-S0169204619308163-main.pdf
    Last checked: 08/10/2021
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):de Bell, Siân; White, Mathew; Griffiths, Alistair; Darlow, Alison; Taylor, Timothy; Wheeler, Benedict; Lovell, Rebecca
Author Affiliation:de Bell, White, Taylor, Wheeler, and Lovell: European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter, United Kingdom; Griffiths: Royal Horticultural Society, United Kingdom; Darlow: Natural England, United Kingdom
Title:Spending time in the garden is positively associated with health and wellbeing: Results from a national survey in England
Source:Landscape and Urban Planning. Vol. 200, August 2020, p. 44206.
# of Pages:10
Publishing Information:Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier
Abstract/Contents:"Research has found that natural environments within urban areas are associated with benefits for human health and wellbeing. However, most studies have primarily focused on publically accessible green space. Less is known about domestic gardens, which in the UK comprise a high proportion of land cover in urban areas and could form a resource for health promotion. This study analysed secondary data from the Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment (MENE) survey, a representative survey of the English population (n = 7,814). We investigated the relationships between garden access and use and: general health; evaluative and eudaimonic wellbeing; meeting physical activity guidelines; and visiting nature in the last week. Statistical models included a range of individual and area-level socio-demographic variables. Compared to no garden access, access to a private garden was associated with better evaluative wellbeing, and people with access to a private space such as a balcony, yard or patio were more likely to meet physical activity guidelines. Respondents who reported both gardening and using a garden to relax also reported better health and wellbeing, more physical activity, and more nature visits than those who did not. These findings indicate that domestic gardens are a potential health resource and are not necessarily substituted for by other natural environments, highlighting the importance of their provision alongside green space in urban policy and planning."
Language:English
References:65
Note:Tables
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
de Bell, S., M. White, A. Griffiths, A. Darlow, T. Taylor, B. Wheeler, et al. 2020. Spending time in the garden is positively associated with health and wellbeing: Results from a national survey in England. Landscape Urban Plan. 200:p. 44206.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2020.103836
Web URL(s):
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204619308163
    Last checked: 08/10/2021
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204619308163/pdfft?md5=5143cfb819a364cb041a81c5daa62a74&pid=1-s2.0-S0169204619308163-main.pdf
    Last checked: 08/10/2021
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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