Full TGIF Record # 315253
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1016/j.ufug.2021.126983
Web URL(s):https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S161886672100008X
    Last checked: 03/12/2021
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S161886672100008X/pdfft
    Last checked: 04/15/2021
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    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Andrade, Riley; Hondula, David M.; Larson, Kelli L.; Lerman, Susannah B.
Author Affiliation:Andrade: Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University; Hondula: School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University; Larson: School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University, and School of Sustainability, Arizona State University; Lerman: USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station
Title:Landscaping preferences influence neighborhood satisfaction and yard management decisions
Source:Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. Vol. 59, April 2021, p. 1-12.
# of Pages:12
Publishing Information:Jena, Germany: Urban & Fischer
Related Web URL:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S161886672100008X#abs0010
    Last checked: 04/15/2021
    Notes: Abstract only
Abstract/Contents:"Residential landscapes support human well-being and ecological functioning in urban ecosystems. Trees and native plants in yards and neighborhoods positively influence satisfaction, an important component of human well-being and quality of life. However, these patterns may not hold true in arid ecoregions, where the composition of desert vegetation contrasts the tall, broad-leafed trees of temperate regions. The effects of xeric, desert-like landscaping on satisfaction with the neighborhood environment are especially important to consider given the large amount of resources required to support peoples propensity for grassy yards. Although place satisfaction is related to pro-environmental behavior, the multi-scalar relationship between yard management decisions and satisfaction with the neighborhood environment has yet to be established. Here, we test the social-ecological dynamics of landscape preferences, satisfaction with trees and desert plants, and management intensity in residential yards and neighborhoods throughout the desert city of Phoenix, Arizona, USA. We found that wealthy neighborhoods close to desert open space were intensively managed and supported the highest levels of satisfaction. However, there was no direct relationship between satisfaction and management intensity for people who preferred xeric landscaping. Instead, management intensity for people with xeric preferences was related to demographics, such as income and home ownership. There was a relationship between satisfaction and management intensity for people with mesic preferences, suggesting a resource cost to maintain satisfaction for lush, green landscaping in a desert city. Overall, our study supports the assertion that changing yard landscaping may not result in desired changes for high-input management practices."
Language:English
References:94
Note:"Article 126983"
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Andrade, R., D. M. Hondula, K. L. Larson, and S. B. Lerman. 2021. Landscaping preferences influence neighborhood satisfaction and yard management decisions. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. 59:p. 1-12.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2021.126983
Web URL(s):
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S161886672100008X
    Last checked: 03/12/2021
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S161886672100008X/pdfft
    Last checked: 04/15/2021
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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