Full TGIF Record # 67221
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Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1004799323646
    Last checked: 09/27/2017
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Shand, C. A.; Williams, B. L.; Smith, S.; Young, M. E.
Author Affiliation:Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, UK
Title:Temporal changes in C, P and N concentrations in soil solution following application of synthetic sheep urine to a soil under grass
Source:Plant and Soil. Vol. 222, No. 1/2, 2000, p. 1-13.
# of Pages:13
Publishing Information:Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Related Web URL:https://www.springerlink.com/content/qg6t86464231x065/
    Last checked: 10/06/2017
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Carbon; Phosphorus; Nitrogen; Urine; Nitrates; Organic matter; Soil pollution; Agrostis tenuis; Defoliation; Urea; Ammonia; Chemical properties of soil; Uptake; Soil analysis; Soil pH; Soil solution; Soil moisture; Mowing; Clipping weight
Abstract/Contents:"We have determined the temporal changes in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and P and N components in soil solution following application of synthetic sheep urine (500 kg N ha⁻¹) to a brown forest soil in boxes sown with Agrostis capillaris. Three contrasting defoliation treatments (no cutting, single cut before urine application and regular cutting twice per week) plus a fallow soil were studied. The synthetic urine contained ¹⁵N labelled urea and was P-free. Intact soil cores were taken after 2, 7, 14, 21 and 56 d and centrifuged to obtain soil solution. The urea in the synthetic urine was rapidly hydrolysed in the soil, increasing soil solution pH, DOC and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentrations. For the regularly defoliated sward, DOC and P reached maximum concentrations (4000 mg DOC L⁻¹ and 59 mg TDP L⁻¹) on day 7. From their peak values, pH and DOC and P concentrations generally decreased with time and at day 56 were near those of the control. Concentrations of NH₄⁺ and NO₃⁻ in the no-urine treatments fluctuated and the greatest treatment differences were between the fallow soil and the soil sown with grass. Adding synthetic urine increased NH₄⁺ and NO₃⁻ in the no-urine treatments fluctuated and the greatest treatment differences were between the fallow soil and the soil sown with grass. Adding synthetic urine increased NH₄⁺ concentrations during the first week, but NO₃]- concentrations decreased. This was consistent with the ¹]5N labelling of the NO₃⁻ pool which required 3 weeks to reach that of ¹⁵NH₄⁺. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) reached a maximum value at day 7 with a concentration of 409 mg N L⁻¹. The DON in soil solution contained no detectable amounts of ¹⁵N label indicating that it was derived from sources in the soil. Differences in soil solution composition related to the effect of the other cutting treatments and the fallow treatment were small compared to the effect of the synthetic urine addition."
Language:English
References:32
Note:Graphs
Tables
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Shand, C. A., B. L. Williams, S. Smith, and M. E. Young. 2000. Temporal changes in C, P and N concentrations in soil solution following application of synthetic sheep urine to a soil under grass. Plant Soil. 222(1/2):p. 1-13.
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https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1004799323646
    Last checked: 09/27/2017
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