Full TGIF Record # 69616
Item 1 of 1
Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A%3A1004744914998
    Last checked: 09/27/2017
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: Guide page
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Gorissen, A.; Cotrufo, M. F.
Author Affiliation:Gorissen: Research Institute for Agrobiology and Soil Fertility (AB), Wageningen, The Netherlands; Cotrufo: Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Università di Napoli, Caserta, Italy
Title:Decomposition of leaf and root tissue of three perennial grass species grown at two levels of atmospheric CO₂ and N supply
Meeting Info.:Capri, Italy: September 24-27, 1998
Source:Plant and Soil. Vol. 224, No. 1, 2000, p. 75-84.
# of Pages:10
Publishing Information:Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Decomposition; Leaves; Roots; Tissues; Perennial grasses; Carbon dioxide; Nitrogen; Lolium perenne; Agrostis tenuis; Festuca ovina; Uptake; Nitrogen fertility; Soil fertility; Nitrogen cycle; Carbon cycle
Cultivar Names:Bardot; Barok; Barlet
Abstract/Contents:"Leaf and root tissue of Lolium perenne L., Agrostis capillaris L. and Festuca ovina L. grown under ambient (350μ1 1 ¹ CO₂) and elevated (700 μ1 1 ¹) CO₂ in a continuously ¹⁴C-labelled atmosphere and at two soil N levels, were incubated at 14°C for 222 days. Decomposition of leaf and root tissue grown in the low N treatment was not affected by elevated [CO₂], whereas decomposition in the high N treatment was significantly reduced by 7% after 222 days. Despite the increased C/N ratio (g g ¹) of tissue cultivated at elevated [CO₂] when compared with the corresponding ambient tissue, there was no significant correlation between initial C/N ratio and ¹⁴C respired. This finding suggests that the CO₂-induced changes in decomposition rates do not occur via CO^D2-induced changes in C/N ratios of plant materials. We combined the decomposition data with data on ¹⁴C uptake and allocation for the same plants, and give evidence that elevated [CO₂] has the potential to increase soil C stores in grassland via increasing C uptake and shifting C allocation towards the roots, with an inherent slower decomposition rate than the leaves. An overall increase of 15% in ¹⁴C remaining after 222 days was estimated for the combined tissues, i.e., the whole plants; the leaves made a much smaller contribution to the C remaining (+6%) than the roots (+26%). This shows the importance of clarifying the contribution of roots and leaves with respect to the question whether grassland soils act as a sink or source for atmospheric CO₂."
Language:English
References:29
Note:Tables
Graphs
See Also:Other items relating to: Carbon sequestration of turf
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Gorissen, A., and M. F. Cotrufo. 2000. Decomposition of leaf and root tissue of three perennial grass species grown at two levels of atmospheric CO₂ and N supply. Plant Soil. 224(1):p. 75-84.
Fastlink to access this record outside TGIF: https://tic.msu.edu/tgif/flink?recno=69616
If there are problems with this record, send us feedback about record 69616.
Choices for finding the above item:
Web URL(s):
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A%3A1004744914998
    Last checked: 09/27/2017
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: Guide page
Find Item @ MSU
MSU catalog number: SB 13 .P55
Find from within TIC:
   Digitally in TIC by record number.
Request through your local library's inter-library loan service (bring or send a copy of this TGIF record)