Full TGIF Record # 71909
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Web URL(s):http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/01904160009382126
    Last checked: 10/13/2015
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Lucena, Juan J.
Title:Effects of bicarbonate, nitrate and other environmental factors on iron deficiency chlorosis. A review
Section:Environmental factors affecting iron deficiency
Other records with the "Environmental factors affecting iron deficiency" Section
Source:Journal of Plant Nutrition. Vol. 23, No. 11/12, November/December 2000, p. 1591-1606.
# of Pages:16
Publishing Information:New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Bicarbonates; Nitrates; Environmental effects; Chemistry; Environmental factors; Iron; Nutrient deficiency; Chlorosis; Iron chlorosis; Calcareous soils; Soil pH; Uptake; Nutrient uptake; Nutrient availability; Thermodynamics; Kinetics
Abstract/Contents:"The influence of several environmental factors on the occurrence of iron deficiency chlorosis on calcareous soils, also called bicarbonate induced chlorosis, is described. Bicarbonate in the soil solution is a strong pH buffer, mainly in the presence of calcium carbonate. Since bicarbonate is quite mobile, and CO₂ diffusion is a slow process, the pH decrease in such soils after proton release by plants is small. Also, the ferric reductase activity of plant roots declines sharply at high pHs. The chemical Fe(III) reduction depends on the pe+pH; so, the lower the pH, the more favored is the formation of Fe(II) from the Fe(III) in the rizosphere[rhizosphere]. Nitrate can be acquired by the roots along with a proton cotransport that increase the pH outside the root plasmalemma, but a redox effect may be also important. In the rizosphere[rhizosphere], the conditions for the reduction of nitrate (N(V)) to nitrite (N(III)) and ammonia (N(-III)) are attained before than the conditions for the Fe(III) reduction from a solid phase. So, from the thermodynamic point of view, the electrons released by the plant can be taken directly by nitrate instead of Fe(III), or the Fe(II) formed can be reoxidized by the nitrate. Furthermore, if nitrate and nitrite reductions occurs in the rizosphere[rhizosphere], microsite pH increases at the root surface."
Language:English
References:42
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Lucena, J. J. 2000. Effects of bicarbonate, nitrate and other environmental factors on iron deficiency chlorosis. A review. J. Plant Nutr. 23(11/12):p. 1591-1606.
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Web URL(s):
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/01904160009382126
    Last checked: 10/13/2015
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: QK 867 .J67
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