Full TGIF Record # 72802
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Web URL(s):http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880900002073
    Last checked: 10/09/2015
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):McKay, H. V.; Milsom, T. P.; Feare, C. J.; Ennis, D. C.; O'Connell, D. P.; Haskell, D. J.
Author Affiliation:Central Science Laboratory, Wildlife Management and Conservation Team, Sand Hutton, York, UK
Title:Selection of forage species and the creation of alternative feeding areas for dark-bellied brent geese Branta bernicla bernicla in southern UK coastal areas
Source:Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Environment. Vol. 84, No. 2, April 2001, p. 99-113.
# of Pages:15
Publishing Information:Amsterdam: Elsevier Science Publishers
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Forage; Feeding preferences; Geese; Grasslands; Grazing; Trifolium repens; Lolium perenne; Festuca rubra subsp. rubra; Phleum pratense; Comparisons; Cover crops; Choice of species
Cultivar Names:Tivoli
Abstract/Contents:"The aim of this study is to provide a better scientific basis for recommendations for the creation and management of grassland alternative feeding areas (AFAs); agricultural land managed specifically for brent geese (Branta bernicla bernicla). This is required if AFAs are to be used to help reduce damage levels due to goose grazing. The preferences of brent geese for four species of forage were measured over two winters, on experimental plots established in spring 1992 on coastal arable farmland in Chichester Harbour, UK. Counts of goose droppings (a good index of grazing pressure) over the following two winters confirmed that brent geese prefer white clover (Trifolium repens L.) to perennial ryegrass (Lolium prenne L.), red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) or timothy (Phelum pratense L.). No differences in preference between the grass species were apparent. The preference for clover plots over grass could be explained by higher biomass, percentage live matter, and protein, and shorter swards at the beginning of the winter. The preference for clover over grass persisted to the second winter when the sward height of plots did not differ significantly. The costs and benefits of growing clover are discussed within the framework of current farming practice. These results suggest that clover, rather than fertilised grass, may be a more effective cover crop on AGAs, including set-aside fields managed for migratory geese. The sward should be managed to encourage clover growth, which would probably involve frequent cutting but no fertiliser. Further research is needed on clover replenishment rate over the winter season and the possible benefits cutting but no fertiliser. Further research is needed on clover replenishment rate over the winter season and the possible benefits of clover leys to other wildlife."
Language:English
References:52
Note:Figures
Graphs
Tables
Geographic Terms:United Kingdom
See Also:Other items relating to: GEESE
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
McKay, H. V., T. P. Milsom, C. J. Feare, D. C. Ennis, D. P. O'Connell, and D. J. Haskell. 2001. Selection of forage species and the creation of alternative feeding areas for dark-bellied brent geese Branta bernicla bernicla in southern UK coastal areas. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 84(2):p. 99-113.
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http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880900002073
    Last checked: 10/09/2015
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: S 589.7 .A34
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