Full TGIF Record # 73380
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Web URL(s):http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1081/PLN-100104972
    Last checked: 10/13/2015
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Sistani, K. R.; Mays, D. A.
Author Affiliation:USDA-ARS, Crop Science Research Laboratory, Waste Mangagement and Forage Research Unit, Mississippi State, MS
Title:Nutrient requirements of seven plant species with potential use in shoreline erosion control
Source:Journal of Plant Nutrition. Vol. 24, No. 3, 2001, p. 459-467.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Nutritional requirements; Erosion control; Bank erosion; Bank protection; Fertility; Fertilization; Straw; Coir; Typha latifolia; Juncus effusus; Scirpus tabernaemontani; Panicum hemitomon; Nitrogen fertilization; Paspalum notatum; Panicum virgatum; Spartina; Wetlands
Abstract/Contents:"Many factors contribute to shoreline erosion including a lack of vegetation that can survive under periods of flooding, drying, and wave action. Biotechinical methods of shoreline erosion control seem to be a low cost alternative to conventional methods. This sutdy was an attempt, first, to evaluate the feasibility of several breakwater materials for controlling wave action; and secondly, to study the growth response of seven wetland and terrestrial plant species for potential use in biotechnical methods of shoreline erosion control. The site for the field experiment was Water F. George Reservoir located on the Chattahoochee River between Alabama and Georgia. In a greenhouse experiment, plants were evaluated at different fertility levels. Results of the field experiments indicated that wire-wrapped square straw bales, coconut fiber logs, and pine logs were effective in controlling wave action and trapping sand. Round hay bales were less effective breakwater materials. Greenhouse data indicated that cattail, soft rush, soft stem bulrush, and maidencane responded significantly to nitrogen fertilizer up to 50 kg ha-1. This rate was also optimum for bahiagrass, switchgrass, and marsh hay cordgrass. No significant increase in dry matter yield or stem count was observed by the addition of N up to 100 kg ha-1. Most of these plant species did not significantly respond to the addition of micronutrients."
Language:English
References:8
Note:Tables
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Sistani, K. R., and D. A. Mays. 2001. Nutrient requirements of seven plant species with potential use in shoreline erosion control. J. Plant Nutr. 24(3):p. 459-467.
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Web URL(s):
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1081/PLN-100104972
    Last checked: 10/13/2015
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: QK 867 .J67
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