Full TGIF Record # 74391
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Web URL(s):http://web.archive.org/web/20061205204057/http://www.uoguelph.ca/GTI/itsweb/proceedings.pdf#page=32
    Last checked: 05/23/2017
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    Notes: Document is within a single large file
https://archive.lib.msu.edu/tic/its/articles/2001pro28a.pdf
    Last checked: 01/30/2017
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Content Type:Abstract or Summary only
Author(s):Cisar, J. L.
Author Affiliation:University of Florida
Title:The occurrence and alleviation by surfactants of soil-water repellency on sand-based turfgrass systems
Section:Abstracts
Other records with the "Abstracts" Section
Meeting Info.:Toronto, Ontario, Canada: 15-21 July, 2001
Source:IXth International Turfgrass Research Conference. Vol. 9, 2001, p. 28.
# of Pages:1
Publishing Information:[Toronto, Canada]: International Turfgrass Society
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Surfactants; Water repellency; Sand-based root zones; Hydrophobic soils; Localized dry spots; Geographical distribution; Soil water content; Irrigation practices; Wetting agents; Water use
Abstract/Contents:"The phenomenon of soil-water repellency, also known as 'hydrophobic soil', 'dry patch', or 'localized dry spot (LDS)', has been recognized in turf in the USA for a number of years. The cause of the repellency is not fully understood although some evidence suggests that sand grains become coated with certain hydrophobic organic compounds deposited by fungal and other soil-borne biotic components. The phenomenon is most evident in very sandy soils that are often found in coastal regions in the southern USA and as the major soil base for athletic and golf course construction. Once soil-water repellent areas develop, the sand is very hard to re-wet. It can remain dry even after very intense or prolonged rain or irrigation. Needless to say, root activity essentially ceases in zones of water repellency, resulting in very weak stands of turfgrass. The best method of preventing water repellency is to maintain high moisture levels: irrigate frequently. As long as the soil is kept moist the repellency phenomena does not occur. Clearly this irrigation strategy practice goes against government water management agency objectives for reducing water use on turfgrass areas. Never-the-less, restricted or reduced irrigation practices have resulted in an increase in water repellency which often leads to over-irrigation to compensate for wilted turfgrass. Few studies have been conducted that demonstrate the usefulness of wetting agents, surfactants, and penetrants to reduce soil-water repellency. This symposium paper reviews and discusses the factors related to soil water repellency and approaches to alleviate soil water repellency in turfgrass systems."
Language:English
References:0
Note:This item is an abstract only!
See Also:Other items relating to: Wetting Agents
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Cisar, J. L. 2001. The occurrence and alleviation by surfactants of soil-water repellency on sand-based turfgrass systems. Int. Turfgrass Res. Conf. 9:p. 28.
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Web URL(s):
http://web.archive.org/web/20061205204057/http://www.uoguelph.ca/GTI/itsweb/proceedings.pdf#page=32
    Last checked: 05/23/2017
    Requires: Adobe Acrobat
    Notes: Document is within a single large file
https://archive.lib.msu.edu/tic/its/articles/2001pro28a.pdf
    Last checked: 01/30/2017
    Requires: PDF Reader
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