Full TGIF Record # 79210
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Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1023%2FA%3A1014483303813.pdf
    Last checked: 09/27/2017
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Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Eviner, Valerie T.; Rillig, Matthias C.; Wright, Sara F.
Author Affiliation:Eviner: Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA; Rillig: Microbial Ecology Program, Division of Biological Sciences, The University of Montana MT; and Wright: USDA-ARS-SMSL, BARC-W, Beltsville, MD
Title:The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and glomalin in soil aggregation: Comparing effects of five plant species
Source:Plant and Soil. Vol. 238, No. 2, January 2002, p. 325-333.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Related Web URL:http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A%3A1014483303813
    Last checked: 07/28/2014
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Mycorrhizal fungi; Aggregates; Water; Proteins; Comparisons; Root length; Living hyphal length; Percent living ground cover; Root weight; Avena barbata; Aegilops triuncialis; Taeniatherum; Trifolium
Abstract/Contents:"Soil aggregation and soil structure are fundamental properties of natural and managed ecosystems. However, most of our knowledge on the role of plant species in soil aggregation is derived from work in agroecosystems or with agriculturally important plants. Here we examine the effects of five plant species on soil aggregate water stability. The five species (three grasses, one forb, and a legume) were from the same natural grassland, and were growm in monoculture plots in the field. Our first goal was to test if productivity- related or species-specific factors would prevail in determining soil aggregation. We also tested what the relative importance of the soil protein glomalin (produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, AMF) in soil aggregation is, compared to other factors, including AMF hyphal and root length and percent plant cover. We found significant differences in soil aggregate water stability (1-2mm size class) for the five plant species examined, and corresponding differences in plant cover, root weight and length, AMF soil hyphal length, and glomalin concentrations. A structural equation modeling approach (path analysis) was used to distinguish direct from indirect effects of factors on soil aggregation based on covariance structures. Root length, soil glomalin, and percent cover contributed equally strong paths to water soluble aggregation. The direct effect of glomalin was much stronger than the direct effect of AMF hyphae themselves, suggesting that this protein is involved in a very important hypha-mediated mechanism of soil aggregate stabilization, at least for the 1-2mm size class of aggregates."
Language:English
References:29
Note:Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Eviner, V. T., M. C. Rillig, and S. F. Wright. 2002. The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and glomalin in soil aggregation: Comparing effects of five plant species. Plant Soil. 238(2):p. 325-333.
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Web URL(s):
https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1023%2FA%3A1014483303813.pdf
    Last checked: 09/27/2017
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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