Full TGIF Record # 94964
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DOI:10.1081/CSS-120029733
Web URL(s):http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ftinterface~content=a713624805~fulltext=713240930
    Last checked: 07/10/2006
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http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ftinterface~content=a713624805~fulltext=713240928
    Last checked: 07/10/2006
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Li, Yuzhong; Herbert, Stephen J.
Author Affiliation:Li: Agrometeorology Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; and Herbert: Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts
Title:Influence of prescribed burning on nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in grassland
Source:Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. Vol. 35, No. 3/4, February 2004, p. 571-581.
# of Pages:11
Publishing Information:New York, NY: Marcel Dekker
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Prescribed burning; Nitrogen; Nitrogen mineralization; Nitrification; Grasslands; Microorganisms; Nitrates
Abstract/Contents:"The seasonal dynamics of gross nitrogen (N) mineralization, nitrification, and mineral nitrogen consumption rates were studied with the 15N pool dilute technique in burned and unburned Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvel. (Chinese Wildryegrass) grasslands. Gross N mineralization is the gross rate of the process of the conversion of organic N to the NH4+ form during decomposition before N immobilization by microbes. Similarly, gross nitrification is the gross rate of the conversion of NH4+ and organic N to NO3- before N immobilization by microbes, and consumption is sum of mineral N losses by biological or nonbiological processes. Results indicated that gross mineralization and nitrification rates, NH4+ and NO3- consumption rates, and soil concentrations of NH4+ were higher in burned grassland areas than in unburned areas in April and May and that all were lower or similar compared to unburned areas in September. The soil concentrations of NO3- indicated no difference between burned and unburned areas in April and May, but burned areas had higher NO3- in July and September. Results indicate that prescribed burning in spring could benefit the renewal of grasslands of northeast China through mobilization of soil N pools."
Language:English
References:31
Note:Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Li, Y., and S. J. Herbert. 2004. Influence of prescribed burning on nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in grassland. Commun. Soil. Sci. Plant Anal. 35(3/4):p. 571-581.
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DOI: 10.1081/CSS-120029733
Web URL(s):
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ftinterface~content=a713624805~fulltext=713240930
    Last checked: 07/10/2006
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: PDF Version
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ftinterface~content=a713624805~fulltext=713240928
    Last checked: 07/10/2006
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: HTML Version
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MSU catalog number: S 590 .C54
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