Full TGIF Record # 102575
Item 1 of 1
Web URL(s):http://www.bioone.org/bioone/?request=get-document&issn=0046-225X&volume=034&issue=01&page=0096
    Last checked: 11/2005
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited access website
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Boulton, April M.; Davies, Kendi F.; Ward, Philip S.
Author Affiliation:Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis, California
Title:Species richness, abundance, and composition of ground-dwelling ants in Northern California grasslands: Role of plants, soil, and grazing
Section:Community and ecosystem ecology
Other records with the "Community and ecosystem ecology" Section
Source:Environmental Entomology. Vol. 34, No. 1, February 2005, p. 96-104.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:College Park, MD: Entomological Society of America
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Biodiversity; Grazing; Grasslands; Grassland management; Soil chemistry; Soil texture; Dominant species; Formicidae; Plant community analysis; Physical soil analysis
Abstract/Contents:"We examined the role of cattle grazing, plants, and soil attributes on species richness, abundance, and composition of ground-dwelling ants in northern California serpentine and nonserpentine grasslands. In addition, we analyzed the relationship between three numerically dominant ant species and overall ant species richness and abundance. We used pitfall traps to collect worker ants at 80 sites over a 2-wk period in May 2002. Twenty species of ants were identified from a total of 5,149 worker ants; 80% of all individuals belonged to three dominant species: Messor andrei (Mayr), Pheidole californica Mayr, and Solenopsis xyloni McCook. Ant species richness was negatively affected by grazing on nonserpentine soils only. In general, soil chemistry and texture formed the most consistent associations with the ant community. Plants were less important than soil attributes in explaining variation in overall ant species richness and abundance, but the abundance of the three dominant ant species was significantly correlated with plant biomass or plant richness. Based on logistic regression analysis, the presence absence of each dominant ant species was negatively correlated with the abundance of the other two dominants. However, the three numerically dominant ant species did not correlate with overall ant species richness or abundance."
Language:English
References:46
Note:Tables
Geographic Terms:California
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Boulton, A. M., K. F. Davies, and P. S. Ward. 2005. Species richness, abundance, and composition of ground-dwelling ants in Northern California grasslands: Role of plants, soil, and grazing. Environ. Entomol. 34(1):p. 96-104.
Fastlink to access this record outside TGIF: https://tic.msu.edu/tgif/flink?recno=102575
If there are problems with this record, send us feedback about record 102575.
Choices for finding the above item:
Web URL(s):
http://www.bioone.org/bioone/?request=get-document&issn=0046-225X&volume=034&issue=01&page=0096
    Last checked: 11/2005
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited access website
Find Item @ MSU
MSU catalog number: SB 599 .E44
Find from within TIC:
   Digitally in TIC by record number.
Request through your local library's inter-library loan service (bring or send a copy of this TGIF record)