Full TGIF Record # 147107
Item 1 of 1
Web URL(s):http://www.turf.uconn.edu/pdf/research/reports/2006.pdf#page=106
    Last checked: 04/16/2009
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Notes: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Report
Content Type:Abstract or Summary only
Author(s):Kaminski, J. E.; Dernoeden, P. H.; Fidanza, M. A.
Title:Environmental monitoring and exploratory development of a predictive model for dead spot of creeping bentgrass
Section:Scientific publications (abstracts & citations)
Other records with the "Scientific publications (abstracts & citations)" Section
Source:2006 Turfgrass Research Report [Connecticut]. 2007, p. 93.
# of Pages:1
Publishing Information:Storrs, CT: Department of Plant Science, University of Connecticut
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Agrostis stolonifera; Ascosphaera; Disease development; Ophiosphaerella agrostis; Symptoms
Abstract/Contents:"Dead spot of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) is incited by Ophiosphaerella agrostis. The objectives of this three year field study were to: 1) elucidate environmental conditions associated with the expression of dead spot symptoms; 2) develop a model to assist in predicting the appearance of dead spot symptoms and epidemics in creeping bentgrass; and 3) elucidate the association between ascospore release and the appearance of new dead spot symptoms. Dead spot symptoms generally did not occur at temperatures (air or soil) below 15°C. Two descriptive models were developed that predicted the appearance of dead spot symptoms with an accuracy of 74% to 80%. Between 2000 and 2002, the appearance of new dead spot infection centers was most accurately predicted (80%) by mean soil temperatures ≥20°C. In years with severe levels of dead spot, the occurrence of major infection events was predicted on 37 of 40 days (93%). A combination of elevated air and soil temperatures, low relative humidity, shortened periods of leaf wetness, and high levels of solar radiation were associated with the development of major dead spot epidemics. Ascospore discharge and the appearance of new infection centers occurred in a cyclic pattern that peaked about every 12 days. New infection centers appeared 3 to 10 days after a large release of ascospores."
Language:English
References:0
Note:"Do not duplicate, reprint, or publish information within this report without the expressed written consent of the author(s)"
This item is an abstract only!
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Kaminski, J. E., P. H. Dernoeden, and M. A. Fidanza. 2007. Environmental monitoring and exploratory development of a predictive model for dead spot of creeping bentgrass. 2006 Turfgrass Res. Rep. [CT]. p. 93.
Fastlink to access this record outside TGIF: https://tic.msu.edu/tgif/flink?recno=147107
If there are problems with this record, send us feedback about record 147107.
Choices for finding the above item:
Web URL(s):
http://www.turf.uconn.edu/pdf/research/reports/2006.pdf#page=106
    Last checked: 04/16/2009
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Notes: Item is within a limited-access website
Find Item @ MSU
MSU catalog number: b5428823~S39a
Find from within TIC:
   Digitally in TIC by file name: uconn2007
Request through your local library's inter-library loan service (bring or send a copy of this TGIF record)