Full TGIF Record # 210297
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DOI:10.1603/EN11145
Web URL(s):http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1603/EN11145
    Last checked: 08/27/2012
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1603/EN11145
    Last checked: 08/27/2012
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Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Addesso, Karla M.; Mcauslane, Heather J.; Cherry, Ron
Author Affiliation:Addesso: Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Mcauslane and Cherry: Entomology and Nematology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Title:Aggregation behavior of the southern chinch bug (Hemiptera: Blissidae)
Section:Behavior
Other records with the "Behavior" Section
Source:Environmental Entomology. Vol. 41, No. 4, August 2012, p. 887-895.
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:College Park, Maryland: Entomological Society of America
Related Web URL:http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1603/EN11145
    Last checked: 09/11/2012
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Behavior; Bioassay; Blissus insularis; Pest control; Population dynamics; Stenotaphrum secundatum
Cultivar Names:Floratam
Abstract/Contents:"The southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis Barber, forms dense, multigenerational aggregations in St. Augustinegrass lawns leading to grass death from sap feeding. We conducted laboratory bioassays to better understand the signals responsible for the formation and maintenance of southern chinch bug aggregations. In small arena assays, chinch bugs demonstrated a stronger aggregation response over time and aggregated more often on or beneath St. Augustinegrass leaf blades than on or under artificial leaf-like shelters constructed from white or green paper. In Y-tube olfactometer assays, bugs of different age and sex were attracted to volatiles from mixed-sex chinch bug aggregations and showed particular attraction to groups of adult female chinch bugs. Adult males and nymphs were also attracted to adult males. Nymphs were attracted to nymphs and were also more attracted to aggregation volatiles when they could see bugs in the arm of the Y-tube. Adult males were more attracted to short-winged than long-winged adults, while females and nymphs demonstrated no preference. All bugs were attracted to St. Augustinegrass volatiles when presented alone, but only males preferred the odor of grass over odor released from a chinch bug mixed-sex aggregation. When presented with a choice of grass and grass + aggregation volatiles, males preferred the combined treatment. The results of these assays suggest that a complex combination of life stage, sex, as well as plant and insect-derived signals influence chinch bug aggregation behavior."
Language:English
References:37
Note:Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Addesso, K. M., H. J. McAuslane, and R. Cherry. 2012. Aggregation behavior of the southern chinch bug (Hemiptera: Blissidae). Environ. Entomol. 41(4):p. 887-895.
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DOI: 10.1603/EN11145
Web URL(s):
http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1603/EN11145
    Last checked: 08/27/2012
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1603/EN11145
    Last checked: 08/27/2012
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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MSU catalog number: b2206896a
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