Full TGIF Record # 231935
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1080/01904167.2011.610489
Web URL(s):http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01904167.2011.610489
    Last checked: 10/31/2013
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/01904167.2011.610489
    Last checked: 10/31/2013
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Wherley, Benjamin; Bowman, Daniel; Shi, Wei; Rufty, Thomas Jr.
Author Affiliation:Wherley: Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas; Bowman and Rufty: Department of Crop Science; Shi: Department of Soil Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina
Title:Effect of soil saturation on development and 15N-nitrate uptake efficiency of two warm season grasses emerging from dormancy
Source:Journal of Plant Nutrition. Vol. 34, No. 13, 2011, p. 2039-2054.
# of Pages:16
Publishing Information:New York, New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.
Related Web URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01904167.2011.610489#.UnflNhDOR8E
    Last checked: 11/04/2013
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Cynodon dactylon; Dormancy; Effluent water use; Eremochloa ophiuroides; Nutrient uptake; Overwatering; Water conservation
Abstract/Contents:"Use of effluent on turfgrass is increasing due to population growth and limited water supplies. Because effluent is generated continuously, turf managers may be forced to over-irrigate, leading to soil saturation. Although the nutrients in effluent are readily absorbed by turf, the effects of prolonged soil saturation on uptake are unknown. This research examined the impact of soil saturation on plant development and nitrate uptake of two warm-season turfgrasses emerging from dormancy. Dormant grass/soil cores of hybrid bermudagrass and common centipedegrass were treated to stimulate regrowth, with soil moisture controlled at saturation (~0.36 cm3 cm-3) or field capacity (0.13 cm3 cm-3). Soil saturation reduced canopy development in both species, but shoot biomass was affected only in bermudagrass. Nitrate uptake by both species was generally unaffected by soil saturation. While extended periods of soil saturation may alter plant development, they do not impair the ability of these turfgrasses to absorb nitrogen."
Language:English
References:37
Note:Tables
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Wherley, B., D. Bowman, W. Shi, and T. Jr. Rufty. 2011. Effect of soil saturation on development and 15N-nitrate uptake efficiency of two warm season grasses emerging from dormancy. J. Plant Nutr. 34(13):p. 2039-2054.
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DOI: 10.1080/01904167.2011.610489
Web URL(s):
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01904167.2011.610489
    Last checked: 10/31/2013
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/01904167.2011.610489
    Last checked: 10/31/2013
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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