Full TGIF Record # 232164
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DOI:10.1080/00103629109368525
Web URL(s):http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/00103629109368525
    Last checked: 02/23/2018
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: Guide page with abstract
Publication Type:
i
Report
Author(s):Stout, W. L.; Staley, T. E.; Shaffer, J. A.; Jung, G. A.
Author Affiliation:Stout, Shaffer, and Jung: U.S. Regional Pasture Research Laboratory, University Park, Pennsylvania; Staley: Appalachian Regional Soil and Water Conservation Laboratory, Beckley, WV; Stout, Staley, Shaffer, and Jung: USDA-ARS
Title:Quantitative effects of soil depth and soil and fertilizer nitrogen on nitrogen uptake by tall fescue and switchgrass
Source:Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. Vol. 22, No. 15-16, 1991, p. 1647-1660.
# of Pages:14
Publishing Information:New York, New York: Marcel Dekker
Related Web URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00103629109368525
    Last checked: 11/06/2013
    Notes: Abstract only
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Chemical properties of soil; Fertilizer evaluation; Festuca arundinacea; Nitrogen; Nitrogen fertilization; Nitrogen uptake; Panicum virgatum; Soil depth
Abstract/Contents:"In semi-arid regions, soil depth influences soil N uptake, but not ferilizer N uptake. How soil depth interacts with soil and fertilzer[fertilizer] N to influence N uptake in humid regions is not known. The objective was to determine the relative importance of soil depth and soil and fertilizer N uptake, by forage grasses. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) were grown on soils of varying depths. Nitrogen rates are 0, 90, and 180 kgN/ha of 15N depleted (NH4)SO4 applied in a split application on fescue and in one aplication [application] to switchgrass. Total N and fertilizer N uptake, were regressed against fertilizer N, variables related to soil depth (waterholding capacity (WC), water use (WU), water loss (WL), and total soil N (SN). Soil variables explained 28% of the accoutable variation in total N uptake by first cut fescue but only 10% by second cut fescue. Soil variables explained 11% of the accountable variation in fertilizer N uptake by first cut fescue and none by the seoond. Soil variables explained 40% of the accountable variation in the total N uptake, by switchgrass, but only 10% of the variation in the fertilizer N uptake. Only where soil depth was less than 90 cm did it have a significant effect on the fertilizer N uptake by first cut fescue. Soil depth had no significant effect on the uptake, of fertilizer N by second cut fescue or switchgrass."
Language:English
References:Unknown
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Stout, W. L., T. E. Staley, J. A. Shaffer, and G. A. Jung. 1991. Quantitative effects of soil depth and soil and fertilizer nitrogen on nitrogen uptake by tall fescue and switchgrass. Commun. Soil. Sci. Plant Anal. 22(15-16):p. 1647-1660.
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DOI: 10.1080/00103629109368525
Web URL(s):
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/00103629109368525
    Last checked: 02/23/2018
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: Guide page with abstract
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MSU catalog number: b2211306a
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