Full TGIF Record # 313046
Item 1 of 1
DOI:10.1016/j.ufug.2020.126856
Web URL(s):https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866720306737
    Last checked: 1/19/2021
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866720306737/pdfft
    Last checked: 4/8/2021
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Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Ng, Sai Leung; Chu, L. M.; Chan, Shuk Han; Ma, Anson Tsz Hin
Author Affiliation:Ng, Chan, and Ma: Department of Geography and Resource Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong; Chu: School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong
Title:The potential use of waterworks sludge in greening: A bioassay with bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.]
Source:Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. Vol. 55, November 2020, p. [1-9].
# of Pages:9
Publishing Information:Jena, Germany: Urban & Fischer
Abstract/Contents:"Owing to the escalating production of waterworks sludge from growing population and water consumption, conventional options for the management of waterworks sludge may no longer be economically and environmentally viable. It is imperative to develop alternative measures for the sustainable management of waterworks sludge. This study explored the potential use of waterworks sludge as a soil substrate for greening through a bioassay with bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.]. Treatments of the experiment varied with loading rates of waterworks sludge, soil types, and combined uses of fertilizers and peat moss. Several key findings were identified. First, the optimal rate of sludge application was approximately 25 % wt/wt, which was at least 1.5 times higher than the existing literature suggested. Second, it is necessary to add fertilizers and peat moss to make the sludge-loaded soil a suitable growing substrate for plants. The combined use of fertilizers and peat moss were more effective than fertilizers or peat moss used alone. Third, no significant environmental risk was ascertained, in terms of heavy metal pollution, when the loading rate of waterworks sludge was 25 % wt/wt. The results indicated waterworks sludge has a higher potential to be a soil substrate in greening, therefore, it could be a cost-efficient and safe surrogate to traditional measures."
Language:English
References:67
Note:Figures
Tables
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ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
2020. The potential use of waterworks sludge in greening: A bioassay with bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.]. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. 55:p. [1-9].
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DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2020.126856
Web URL(s):
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866720306737
    Last checked: 1/19/2021
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866720306737/pdfft
    Last checked: 4/8/2021
    Requires: PDF Reader
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
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