Full TGIF Record # 72213
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Web URL(s):https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A%3A1026512212113
    Last checked: 09/27/2017
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: Guide page
Publication Type:
i
Refereed
Author(s):Huang, Bingru; Fu, Jinmin
Author Affiliation:Department of Horticulture, Forestry and Recreation Resources, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas
Title:Photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon allocation of two cool-season perennial grasses in response to surface soil drying
Source:Plant and Soil. Vol. 227, No. 1/2, 2000, p. 17-26.
# of Pages:10
Publishing Information:Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Photosynthesis; Respiration; Cool season turfgrasses; Poa pratensis; Festuca arundinacea; Soil moisture; Physiological responses; Roots; Canopy; Drought stress; Leaf water potential; Carbon; Total nonstructural carbohydrate content
Cultivar Names:Livingston; Falcon II
Abstract/Contents:"The study was conducted to investigate carbon metabolic responses to surface soil drying for cool-season grasses. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and tall fescue (Festuca arundinaceae Schreb.) were grown in a greenhouse in split tubes consisting of two sections. Plants were subject to three soil moisture regimes: (1) well-watered control; (2) drying of upper 20-cm soil (upper drying); and (3) drying of whole 40-cm soil profile (full drying). Upper drying for 30 d had no dramatic effects on leaf water potential (ψ leaf) and canopy photosynthetic rate (Pn) in either grass species compared to the well-watered control, but it reduced canopy respiration rate (Rcanopy) and root respiration rate in the top 20 cm of soil (Rtop). For both species in the lower 20 cm of wet soil, root respiration rates (Rbottom) were similar to the control levels, and carbon allocation to roots increased with the upper soil drying, particularly for tall fescue. The proportion of roots decreased in the 0-20 cm drying soil, but increased in the lower 20 cm wet soil for both grass species; the increase was greater for tall fescue. The ψleaf, Pn, Rcanopy, Rtop, Rbottom, and carbon allocation to roots in both soil layers were all significantly higher for upper dried plants than for fully dired plants of both grass species. The reductions in Rcanopy and Rtop in surface drying soil and increases in root respiration and carbon allocation to roots in lower wet soil could help these grasses cope with surface-soil drought stress."
Language:English
References:37
See Also:Also published as chapter 2 of Growth and Physiological Responses of Turfgrasses to Deficit Irrigation, 2003, R=101512 R=101512
Note:Figures
Graphs
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Huang, B., and J. Fu. 2000. Photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon allocation of two cool-season perennial grasses in response to surface soil drying. Plant Soil. 227(1/2):p. 17-26.
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Web URL(s):
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A%3A1026512212113
    Last checked: 09/27/2017
    Access conditions: Item is within a limited-access website
    Notes: Guide page
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MSU catalog number: SB 13 .P55
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